2022 Annual Crime/Security Report

(ref. 668.46(b))

Purpose

The Clark College Security & Safety Department (Campus Security) prepares this report to comply with the “Clery Act.” This report is prepared in cooperation with local law enforcement agencies and Student Affairs, the Office of Instruction the Athletic Department and Human Resources.

 

Campus crime, arrest, and referral statistics include those reported to any campus security authority (see below), law enforcement agency or other entity that provided information in response to a request from the college. Counselors affiliated with Clark College that serve students inform their clients of the procedures to report crime to Campus Security and/or law enforcement on a voluntary or confidential basis, should they feel it is in the best interest of their client.

To obtain a copy of this report, please contact Campus Security at 360-992-2133 or at mailto:Security.Requests@clark.edu

Clery Act

In 1998, the Federal Government passed the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act 20 U.S.C. §1092 (f), also known as the “Clery Act.” This law requires that post-secondary schools, participating in Title IV student financial aid programs, publish a statistical report of crimes occurring on or near the institution’s campus and provide information about security policies, procedures and programs. The specific requirements of the Annual Security Report are outlined in 34 CFR § 668.46.

For more information, please visit the Clery Center Web Site at https://clerycenter.org/ under Policy & Resources.

About Clark College

Clark College is Southwest Washington’s largest public institution of higher education. An open-enrollment community college, it welcomes students of all ages and backgrounds pursuing their educational or career paths each quarter. Students can earn high school diplomasGEDs, certificates, and degrees in a variety of programs including nursingdental hygiene, and mechatronics, to name a few. Also, Clark's Running Start program enrolls high school students so they can earn college credit for little or no cost. 

Clark College's main campus sits on the beautiful 101-acre Vancouver Central Park in the heart of Vancouver, Washington. The college also offers classes on the campus of Washington State University Vancouver and at a satellite location in east Vancouver at the Columbia Tech Center. The college's non-credit Community and Continuing Education  program, offers corporate and continuing-education classes. Clark College has collaborated on partnerships with many regional colleges, universities, and technical institutions, allowing students to apply credits earned at Clark toward their bachelor's degrees. 

Athletic programs at Clark College include men's and women's basketball, co-ed cross country, men's and women's soccer, softball, volleyball, and baseball. Clark College is a member of the Northwest Athletic Conference.

 

Definitions  

Business day. Monday through Friday, excluding any day when the institution is closed.

Campus.

(i) Any building or property owned or controlled by an institution within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area and used by the institution in direct support of, or in a manner related to, the institution's educational purposes, including residence halls; and

(ii) Any building or property that is within or reasonably contiguous to the area identified in paragraph (i) of this definition, that is owned by the institution but controlled by another person, is frequently used by students, and supports institutional purposes (such as a food or other retail vendor).

Campus security authority.

(i) A campus police department or a campus security department of an institution.

(ii) Any individual or individuals who have responsibility for campus security but who do not constitute a campus police department or a campus security department under paragraph (i) of this definition, such as an individual who is responsible for monitoring entrance into institutional property.

(iii) Any individual or organization specified in an institution's statement of campus security policy as an individual or organization to which students and employees should report criminal offenses.

(iv) An official of an institution who has significant responsibility for student and campus activities, including, but not limited to, student housing, student discipline, and campus judicial proceedings. If such an official is a pastoral or professional counselor as defined below, the official is not considered a campus security authority when acting as a pastoral or professional counselor.

Clery geography.

(i) For the purposes of collecting statistics on the crimes listed in paragraph (c) of this section for submission to the Department and inclusion in an institution's annual security report, Clery geography includes -

(A) Buildings and property that are part of the institution's campus;

(B) The institution's noncampus buildings and property; and

(C) Public property within or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus.

(ii) For the purposes of maintaining the crime log required in paragraph (f) of this section, Clery geography includes, in addition to the locations in paragraph (i) of this definition, areas within the patrol jurisdiction of the campus police or the campus security department.

Dating violence. Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim.

(i) The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party's statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.

(ii) For the purposes of this definition -

(A) Dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse.

(B) Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.

(iii) For the purposes of complying with the requirements of this section and § 668.41, any incident meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.

Domestic violence.

(i) A felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed -

(A) By a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim;

(B) By a person with whom the victim shares a child in common;

(C) By a person who is cohabitating with, or has cohabitated with, the victim as a spouse or intimate partner;

(D) By a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred, or

(E) By any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person's acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.

(ii) For the purposes of complying with the requirements of this section and § 668.41, any incident meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.

Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program. A nationwide, cooperative statistical effort in which city, university and college, county, State, Tribal, and federal law enforcement agencies voluntarily report data on crimes brought to their attention. The UCR program also serves as the basis for the definitions of crimes in Appendix A to this subpart and the requirements for classifying crimes in this subpart.

Hate crime. A crime reported to local police agencies or to a campus security authority that manifests evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the perpetrator's bias against the victim. For the purposes of this section, the categories of bias include the victim's actual or perceived race, religion, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, ethnicity, national origin, and disability.

Hierarchy Rule. A requirement in the FBI's UCR program that, for purposes of reporting crimes in that system, when more than one criminal offense was committed during a single incident, only the most serious offense be counted.

Noncampus building or property.

(i) Any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization that is officially recognized by the institution; or

(ii) Any building or property owned or controlled by an institution that is used in direct support of, or in relation to, the institution's educational purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution.

Pastoral counselor. A person who is associated with a religious order or denomination, is recognized by that religious order or denomination as someone who provides confidential counseling, and is functioning within the scope of that recognition as a pastoral counselor.

Professional counselor. A person whose official responsibilities include providing mental health counseling to members of the institution's community and who is functioning within the scope of the counselor's license or certification.

Programs to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking.

(i) Comprehensive, intentional, and integrated programming, initiatives, strategies, and campaigns intended to end dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking that -

(A) Are culturally relevant, inclusive of diverse communities and identities, sustainable, responsive to community needs, and informed by research or assessed for value, effectiveness, or outcome; and

(B) Consider environmental risk and protective factors as they occur on the individual, relationship, institutional, community, and societal levels.

(ii) Programs to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking include both primary prevention and awareness programs directed at incoming students and new employees and ongoing prevention and awareness campaigns directed at students and employees, as defined in paragraph (j)(2) of this section.

Public property. All public property, including thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking facilities, that is within the campus, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus.

Referred for campus disciplinary action. The referral of any person to any campus official who initiates a disciplinary action of which a record is kept and which may result in the imposition of a sanction.

Sexual assault. An offense that meets the definition of rape, fondlingincest, or statutory rape as used in the FBI's UCR program and included in Appendix A of this subpart.

Stalking.

(i) Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to -

(A) Fear for the person's safety or the safety of others; or

(B) Suffer substantial emotional distress.

(ii) For the purposes of this definition -

(A) Course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about a person, or interferes with a person's property.

(B) Reasonable person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim.

(C) Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.

(iii) For the purposes of complying with the requirements of this section and section 668.41, any incident meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.

Test. Regularly scheduled drills, exercises, and appropriate follow-through activities, designed for assessment and evaluation of emergency plans and capabilities.

(ref. 668.46 (a)) 

 

Incident Reporting

For the safety of our campuses and the entire college community, prompt and accurate reporting of all crimes to Campus Security and the appropriate police agencies is strongly encouraged when the victim of a crime elects to or is unable to make such a report without assistance. (ref. 668.46 (b)(2)(iii))

 

Voluntary Confidential Reporting

Victims of on-campus crime that do not wish to pursue action within the Clark College System or the criminal justice system may still consider making a confidential report. With the victim’s permission, a Campus Security Officer will file a report on the details of the incident without revealing the victim’s identity to the public. The purpose of a confidential report is to comply with the victim’s wishes to keep the matter confidential, while taking steps to ensure the future safety of the victim and others. With such information, the College can keep accurate records of the number of incidents involving students, determine where there is a pattern of crime with regard to a particular location, method, or assailant, and alert the campus community to potential danger. Reports filed in this manner are counted and disclosed in the annual crime statistics.

(ref. 668.46 (b)(2)(iv))

Immediate Action

Acts of harassment or abusive behavior, assaults, serious threats, or acts of violence by students shall be reported to student conduct, Campus Security or law enforcement as appropriate.  Violations of the Code of Student Conduct will be addressed through the conduct review process.  Criminal acts will be addressed through the criminal justice system.

Acts of harassment or abusive behavior, assaults, serious threats, or acts of violence by employees shall be reported to the appropriate supervisor or Human Resources, Campus Security or law enforcement, as appropriate.  Violations of college policy will be addressed through Human Resources.  Criminal acts will be addressed through the criminal justice system.

Incidents of any type can also be reported to any Campus Security Authority, who can assist in notifying Campus Security or law enforcement if the victim so chooses.

Reporting Options

Posted in each College building and on campus exterior location maps are lists of essential telephone numbers to call in case of specific emergencies. If a crime is in progress, the VPD can be immediately summoned by calling Emergency 911 (campus phones will dial 9-1-1 direct). From college phones, Campus Security can be reached at extension 2133 on main campus and 6133 at CTC. From off-campus or cell phones, the number is 360-992-2133 main campus and 360-992-6133 at CTC. From college desk phones, Campus Security can also be reached by pressing the “Security” button. Campus Security will accept anonymous reports of crimes and will respond appropriately. Students and employees that have subscribed to the RAVE Guardian smartphone application also have the ability to contact Campus Security by pressing a single button and also have the ability to send text messages and photographs directly to Campus Security.

There are four emergency telephone kiosks (blue phones) located in the parking lot of CTC, one blue phone in the Yellow 1 parking lot near the T-Building and one blue phone in the Yellow 2 parking lot near the STEM building.  All blue phones are programmed to call the campus security office located on main campus and will default to the 9-1-1 system if not answered within 4 rings.

When an incident is reported to Campus Security, a written record may be generated depending on the nature and extent of the circumstances. Copies of incident reports are provided to appropriate campus departments. Reports can be made available to law enforcement and other outside entities through public records requests. Information about how to submit a public records request can be found at https://www.clark.edu/about/governance/public-disclosure-and-records/records/. Notices dealing with special concerns may appear on the college website, in email, text messages or through messages in students’ Canvas shell.


According to Administrative Policy 527.066 Threat and Violence, all Clark College employees shall immediately report acts of violence and/or any serious threats made against them or witnessed by them to 911 and Security at 360-992-2133. Nothing in this policy relieves a college employee from taking immediate action when the safety or security of employees, students, or members of the general public is threatened and time is critical. 

Reports of a student's criminal conduct or violations of the Student Code of Conduct will be forwarded to the Student Conduct Officer. Crimes should also be reported to Campus Security to ensure that they are included in the annual crime statistics and to assist in preparing and forwarding timely warnings to the college community.

(ref. 668.46 (b)(2)), (ref. 668.46(b)(11)(ii))

Timely Warnings

The campus community will receive warning regarding any Clery Act crime that is reported to campus security authorities that is considered to represent a serious or continuing threat to students and employees.

Timely warnings are governed by Clark College Administrative Procedure 527.067 Timely Warnings, which states in part:

In accordance with the federal Clery Act, timely warnings will be issued if:

  1. a crime is reported to campus security authorities; AND
  2. a crime is determined to pose a serious or continuing threat to students, faculty and staff;
  3. a crime occurred on college property, in or on non-college buildings or property owned by the college or on public property that is within college property or immediately adjacent to college property.

 

A timely warning may be issued for any other crime or incident as deemed necessary or appropriate by the college president or designee. (ref. 668.46(e))

 

The following college personnel are authorized to issue a timely warning:

  1. College President
  2. Executive Vice President of Operations
  3. Director of Safety and Security
  4. Director of Marketing
  5. Vice President of Instruction
  6. Vice President of Student Affairs
  7. Vice President of Human Resources and Compliance
  8. Vice President of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion


Warnings shall be provided to the college community in a manner that is timely, that withholds the names of victims as confidential, and that will aid in the prevention of similar occurrences.

 

Timely warnings may be issued in multiple formats that may include, but are not necessarily limited to:

    1. Email to faculty, staff and students
    2. Messages on the college website
    3. Alerts sent through the mass notification systems


Anyone with information warranting a timely warning should report the circumstances to Security or any Campus Security Authority.

(ref. 668.46 (b)(2)(i))

Disclosure of Crime Statistics
Crime statistics include reports of, arrests for, and disciplinary actions arising from selected crimes. The annual crime statistics are derived through a comparison of data collected throughout the calendar year by Campus Security, Student Affairs, Title IX and law enforcement and are governed by Administrative Policy 527.050 Crime Statics.  The data collected from each source is compared to that collected from the other sources in order to eliminate double reporting of single instances and to ensure the hierarchy rule, as described below, is correctly applied.

Clark College has no off-campus resident facilities; therefore, no statistics are recorded for these locations. The college does not record statistics for crimes involving students or student organizations that occur off-campus as part of the Uniform Crime Report.

Questions regarding the statistics published in this report should be directed to Campus Security.

(ref. 668.46 (b)(2)(ii))

 

Campus Security Authority

A campus security authority (CSA) is a Clery Act-specific term that encompasses four groups of individuals and organizations associated with an institution.  The function of a CSA is to report to the official or office designated by the institution to collect crime report information, such as the campus police or security department, those allegations of Clery Act crimes that he or she receives. CSAs are responsible for reporting allegations of Clery Act crimes that are reported to them in their capacity as a CSA.

Clark Colleges provides annual training to all designated CSAs.  This training provides detail about the role and responsibilities of a CSA and the college’s reporting procedures.

Clark College Campus Security Authorities

(ref. 668.46 (b)(2)(iii))

 

Physical Security–Facilities Hours of Use

Clark College buildings are locked by Security when the campus and grounds are closed and/or when the building is not used.  Administrative Procedure 501.000 Access and Allowable Activities in College Facilities governs building use and access, to include after-hours access for faculty and staff.


Main Campus hours are 6:30 am to 10:30 pm Monday through Thursday and 6:30 am to 6:00 pm on Friday through Sunday.

 

CTC hours are 8:00 am to 6:00 pm Monday through Thursday.

CCW hours are Monday through Thursday from 7:00 am to 9:30 pm, Friday from 7:00 am to 6:00 pm and Saturday from 8:00 am to 6:00 pm.

 

In March of 2020, normal operations, including open business hours, were temporarily suspended due to Clark College’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.  In accordance with guidance from the State of Washington, most educational content has been delivered in remote format and access to college property has been restricted to only those authorized to be on campus. In September of 2021, Clark College began expanding its on-site education offerings to include a limited number of face-to-face and hybrid modality classes.

The Director of Security & Safety or designee remains in close contact with the Director of Facilities Services with regard to maintenance requests related to security/safety issues for grounds, parking lots and campus buildings.

(ref. 668.46 (b)(3))

Authority and Jurisdiction of Campus Security

On main campus, security is located on the 1st floor of Gaiser Hall. At CTC, the security office is located on the 1st floor adjacent to the Student Services Information desk. At CCW, the WSU-V Department of Public Safety is located in the Administration Building -VAM 160.

The Security & Safety Department is comprised of a Director, a Campus Security Sergeant, an Administrative Services Manager, full-time and part-time Campus Security Officers, full-time and part-time dispatchers, and part-time support staff. Security is available on main campus 24 hours a day/365 days a year. CTC has a Campus Security Officer assigned Monday -Thursday from 8:00 am to 6:00 pm. CTC is closed on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. The WSU-V Department of Public Safety provides security at CCW.

Campus Security Officers act as first responders for all criminal incidents, provide general patrol of campus facilities and property, investigate incidents, and enforce all traffic safety and parking regulations.  Campus Security coordinates emergency preparedness planning, and provides crime prevention programs. The department responds to all reports of fire and/or requests for medical aid while working in support of emergency responders such as the Vancouver Police Department (VPD) or Vancouver Fire Department (VFD).

Campus Security Officers do not have the authority to make arrests beyond the authority of a “citizen’s arrest.” See State v. Gonzales, 24 Wn. App. 437, 439, 604 P.2d 168 (1979); Guijosa v. Wal-Mart Stores, 101 Wn. App. 777, 791, 6 P.3d 583 (2000) and State v. Malone, 106 Wn.2d 607, 724 P.2d 364 at FN1 (1986). However, they work closely with state and local law enforcement agencies. In accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 132N-156-310, Security officers are authorized to issue parking and traffic citations, impound and/or immobilize vehicles, and control and regulate facilities use, traffic, and parking as prescribed. (ref. 668.46(b)(4)(ii)(A))

Any person interfering with a Campus Security Officer in the discharge of the provisions of these rules and regulations shall be in violation of the Revised Code of Washington (RCW) 9A.76.020: Obstructing a law enforcement officer, and may be subject to arrest by a peace officer.

Trespass Situations

In the event that an individual or group is disruptive to the good order and/or safe operation of the College, the College President or designee shall have the authority to request such individuals leave College premises. This authority includes prohibiting entry and/or withdrawing the license, privilege, or permit of any individual or group to enter on or remain upon any portion of a College building. Individuals who persist in disruptive conduct, violate College policies and procedures, or remain upon College premises, may be denied access to campus or arrested under RCW 9A.52 BURGLARY AND TRESPASS. College personnel and students involved in disruptive or unlawful conduct shall be subject to appropriate disciplinary sanctions provided by law and College policy.

Campus security may deny access to the Clark College campus and/or other College facilities: to any person determined to be in violation of WACs, RCWs, Clark College Board Policies, and/or Clark College  Administrative Policies and Procedures, or any person determined to be a disturbance or otherwise violating the Code of Student Conduct. Persons excluded will be given a written trespass warning informing them that they must leave the property and not return, and that any return to Clark College facilities will subject them to arrest for criminal trespass under RCW 9A.52.070 and 080 and WAC 132N-120-065. Campus Security may provide copies of exclusion notices to law enforcement agencies to facilitate prosecution. (ref. 668.46(b)(4)(i))

Local Law Enforcement Agencies

Campus Security maintains a close working relationship with the Vancouver Police Department (VPD), which has primary jurisdiction over the area(s) that contain all current Clark College properties. All criminal incidents are referred to the VPD. All crime victims and witnesses are strongly encouraged to immediately report any incident to Campus Security as well as the appropriate law enforcement agency. Prompt reporting will ensure timely warning notices on-campus and timely disclosure of complete crime statistics.

The Clark County Sheriff’s Office (CCSO) has concurrent law enforcement jurisdiction on all Clark College properties but is not the primary responding agency. As a standard practice, the CCSO does not respond to campus property unless needed for emergency assistance and called by VPD, or for self-initiated activity by CCSO personnel.

The Washington State Patrol (WSP) also has concurrent law enforcement jurisdiction on all Clark College properties. WSP personnel can conduct self-initiated activity on Clark College property. However, WSP does not typically conduct enforcement activity on campus property unless they are responding to a request for assistance from VPD.

the parties to share information related to reports of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking.  (ref. 668.46(b)(4)(ii))

Clark College and the Vancouver Police have implemented a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). The purpose of this MOU is to meet the statutory requirements established by the Washington State Legislature, specified in 2015 Substitute Senate Bill 5518 and requiring covered institutions to adopt and implement written policies and procedures to ensure that reports of Part 1 violent crimes, hate crimes, or sexual assaults are immediately, or as soon as practicably possible, disclosed to local law enforcement.

It is further the purpose of this MOU to promote collaboration between the Parties to enhance the reporting, investigation, and appropriate response to sexual assault and other covered crimes.

Finally, it is the purpose of this MOU to promote compliance with the numerous state and federal laws that provide specific requirements related to these issues, as outlined in Substitute Senate Bill 5518; the federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (“Clery Act”); and Title IX of the Higher Education Amendments of 1972 (“Title IX”); as well as the Revised Code of Washington and applicable state laws related to health and confidentiality/privacy. (ref. 668.46(b)(4)(ii)(B))

Counselor Confidentiality

Counseling sessions and records are confidential, meaning that our work together will not be disclosed without your expressly written permission. Consultation with Clark College Counseling and Health Center providers and staff may occur to facilitate your care.

According to Washington State law, this confidentiality may be broken in the following situations:

  1. You pose an imminent danger to yourself or others;
  2. If you have a medical emergency during one of our sessions;
  3. You report knowledge of ongoing abuse of a child, an elderly person, or disabled adult;
  4. Legal situations in which your records are subpoenaed.

(ref. 668.46(b)(4)(v))

 

Crime Prevention Education and Security Awareness

The Campus Security Director and/or designee, meets with particular campus departments and personnel to assist with planning related to crime prevention, safety, and security. The Campus Security Director is available upon request to discuss similar issues with interested campus groups or student organizations, and meets with participants in off-campus student programs. VPD, CCSO and the Department of Corrections (DOC) also provide presentations to the college community.

College 101, which is a course that helps students make a successful transition to college.  The 2-credit class provides valuable information and introduces important campus resources.  As of summer quarter 2016, College 101 is required for all students pursuing an Associate of Arts – Direct Transfer Agreement degree from Clark College.  Topics discussed in College 101 include Title IX, Student Rights and Responsibilities, Bystander Intervention, Mass Notification Systems and Campus Safety.


Crime prevention information can also be obtained by accessing the VPD web site at https://www.cityofvancouver.us/police/page/crime-prevention-and-safety

A common theme of all awareness and crime prevention programs is to encourage students and employees to be aware and responsible for their own security and the security of others. Students and employees must also be aware of their responsibility to protect their personal property and property belonging to the college. Information is disseminated to students and employees through crime prevention awareness pamphlets, e mails, security alert posters, displays and articles in the student newspaper. When time is of the essence, information is released to the college community through emergency notifications, timely warnings, and security alerts posted prominently throughout campus and communications methods. 

 

Campus Security maintains a bulletin board on main campus. Hard copies of the crime statistics for main campus, CTC and WSU-Vancouver for the past three years are available at the Lost and Found desk, which is located in Gaiser Hall. (ref. 668.46(b)(5, 6))

 

Student Housing

Clark College does not currently operate any on-campus or off-campus student housing facilities or residence halls. (ref. 668.46(b)(7))

Drug and Alcohol Policies

Clark College has certified its participation and commitment to The Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (DFSCA) of 1989 - also known as the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Act - requires institutions of higher education to establish policies that address unlawful possession, use, or distribution of alcohol and illicit drugs for faculty, staff and students. Clark College faculty, staff and students are also subject to federal and Washington state laws.

More information about Clark College’s participation with the DFSCA can be found at: http://www.clark.edu/campus-life/student-support/security/drug-free-schools-and-communities-act.php.

 Any activities involving the use, possession, distribution, or sale of alcohol, unauthorized prescription drugs, controlled substances, or drug paraphernalia at College facilities are prohibited. Any exceptions must be approved by the College president in accordance with Administrative Procedure 510.040.

Students are governed by WAC 132N-126-025 Prohibited Student Conduct § (10) alcohol, drug and tobacco violations, which states;

(a) Alcohol. The use, possession, delivery, sale, or being observably under the influence of any alcoholic beverage, except as permitted by law and applicable college policies.

(b) Marijuana. The use, possession, delivery, or sale of marijuana or the psychoactive compounds found in marijuana intended for human consumption, regardless of form, or being observably under the influence of marijuana or the psychoactive compounds found in marijuana. While state law permits the recreational use of marijuana, federal law prohibits such use on college premises or in connection with college activities.

(c) Drugs. The use, possession, delivery, sale, or being observably under the influence of any legend drug, including anabolic steroids, androgens, or human growth hormones as defined in chapter 69.41 RCW, or any other controlled substance under chapter 69.50 RCW, except as prescribed for a student's use by a licensed practitioner.

(d) Tobacco, electronic cigarettes and related products. The use of tobacco, electronic cigarettes, and related products in any building owned, leased or operated by the college or in any location where such use is prohibited, including twenty-five feet from entrances, exits, windows that open, and ventilation intakes of any building owned, leased or operated by the college. The use of tobacco, electronic cigarettes, and related products on the college campus is restricted to designated smoking areas. "Related products" include, but are not limited to, cigarettes, pipes, bidi, clove cigarettes, waterpipes, hookahs, chewing tobacco, vaporizers, and snuff.

Violators are subject to college disciplinary action from the Student Conduct office and criminal prosecution fines and imprisonment through local, state or federal law enforcement agencies. (ref. 668.46(b)(8, 9))

Alcohol and Drug Use

Excessive drug and alcohol use can negatively impact your ability to be a successful student.  Use of these substances are also prohibited on campus according to the Code of Student Conduct (WAC 132N-126-025)

If students are concerned that their drug or alcohol use is affecting their lives in negative ways, the counselors at the Counseling and Health Center can help!  Call 360-992-2614 or email chc@clark.edu to schedule an appointment.

Employee Training

All employees are required to review administrative policy related to the use of drugs and alcohol as well as complete in-service training on an annual basis.  Additional education and services are available to employees through the college’s Employee Assistance Program. (ref. 668.46(b)(10))

 

Programs to Prevent Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, and Stalking

In Fall 2017, Clark College received a Campus Programs Grant from the Office on Violence Against Women to reduce sexual assault, domestic/dating violence, and stalking. This grant is designed to strengthen campus response in three areas: strengthening campus security and investigation, implementing prevention and education programs, and enhancing victim services. Current efforts have been enhanced by increasing training for staff in the appropriate use of trauma-informed interview and investigation techniques for cases involving sexual assault, domestic/dating violence, and stalking. Prevention education has been expanded by requiring all students enrolled in College 101 to receive training and information on consent, the prevalence of sexual assault and dating/domestic violence, and basic bystander intervention strategies. During Spring 2019 a peer educator program was piloted where training in several sections of College 101 was facilitated by students and the YWCA Sexual Assault Prevention Specialist. These efforts will be expanded with the goal of having all face-to-face trainings facilitated by peer educators to make trainings more relatable, relevant, and effective.  (ref. 668.46(j)(1)(i))

Both the prevention and bystander intervention programs have been adapted to the diverse and specific needs of historically underserved populations including students who are Deaf/hard of hearing, LGBTQI+, blind/limited vision, of color, veterans, undocumented, on the autism spectrum, and/or have limited language proficiency. Through collaborations with the Teaching & Learning Center and Office of Diversity and Equity prevention education opportunities for all members of the campus community have been more frequent and robust. Trainings and workshops focused on the impact of gendered violence on historically underserved populations have been prioritized and will continue to be expanded. (ref. 668.46(j)(1)(i)(D))

Victim services have been enhanced through training all members of campus disciplinary boards to respond effectively to situations involving sexual assault, and domestic/dating violence.  Through collaboration with local YWCA, our campus has increased capacity to serve victims 24 hours a day, including those students from historically underserved groups (LGBTQI+, international, different cultural groups, etc.) with responsive referral and response protocols to support access to confidential victim services and advocacy. 

Clark College also offers on and off campus resources to student who may be impacted by sexual misconduct. For assistance with counseling, health or mental health related matters and victim advocacy, the Counseling and Health Center can be reached at (360) 992-2614 or chc@clark.edu.  For assistance with legal matters, the Associated Students of Clark College can be reached at (360) 992-2404 or studentlife@clark.edu.  For assistance with visa or immigration related matters, International Programs can be reached at (360) 992-2390 or international@clark.edu. For assistance with financial aid related Matters, the Financial Aid Office can be reached at (360) 992-2864 or finaid@clark.edu. For additional information, please visit the Title IX webpage @ http://www.clark.edu/clark-and-community/about/policies-procedures/title-IX/index.php) and the Resource Guide for Survivors of Sexual Misconduct. (ref. 668.46(b)(11, iv)) (ref 668.46(j)(1)(ii))

For the purpose of defining these acts:

Domestic Violence

Domestic Violence is defined as a felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed by a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim; by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common; by a person who is cohabitating with, or has cohabitated with, the victim as a spouse or intimate partner; by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred; by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.

Under Washington State law “Domestic Violence” is defined in RCW 26.50.010(3). (ref. 668.46(j)(1)(i)(B))

 

Dating Violence

Dating Violence is defined as violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim. The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. For the purposes of this definition, dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse. Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.

Under Washington State law “Dating relationship" is defined in RCW 26.50.010(2). (ref. 668.46(j)(1)(i)(B))

 

Stalking

Stalking is defined as engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others or suffer substantial emotional distress.

For the purposes of this definition, Course of Conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about a person, or interferes with a person’s property. Reasonable Person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim. Substantial Emotional Distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.

Under Washington State law “Stalking” is defined in RCW 9A.46.110. (ref. 668.46(j)(1)(i)(B))

 

Consent

"Consent" means that at the time of the act of sexual intercourse or sexual contact there are actual words or conduct indicating freely given agreement to have sexual intercourse or sexual contact.

Under Washington State law “Consent” is defined in RCW 9A.44.010. (ref. 668.46(j)(1)(i)(C))

 

Clark College Disciplinary Procedures for Allegations of Sexual Misconduct

Clark College’s policy regarding institutional disciplinary action in cases of alleged dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking can be found as outlined in the Student Code of Conduct WAC @ https://app.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=132N-126

Washington State’s Student Code of Conduct outlines how Clark College conducts its disciplinary proceedings, including (but not limited to):

  1. Type of disciplinary proceeding used by the institution; the steps, anticipated timelines, and decision-making process for each type of disciplinary proceeding (WAC 132N-126-100 https://app.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=132N-126-100) (ref. 668.46(k)(1)(i))
  2. How to file a disciplinary complaint proceeding (WAC 132N-126-100 https://app.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=132N-126-100) (ref. 668.46(k)(1)(i))
  3. Describes the standard of evidence that will be used. (WAC 132N-126-230 https://app.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=132N-126-230) (ref. 668.46(j)(1)(ii))
  4. List of possible sanctions the institution may impose (WAC 132N-126-030 https://app.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=132N-126-030) (ref. 668.46(j)(1)(iii))
  5. The rights of the parties and their representation (WAC 132N-126-225 https://app.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=132N-126-225) (ref. 668.46(j)(2)(iv))

These disciplinary hearings shall include a prompt, fair, and impartial process from the initial investigation to the final result (WAC 132N-126-020 https://app.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=132N-126-020) (ref. 668.46(j)(2)(i)) and be conducted by officials who receive annual training on issues related to dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking and on how to conduct an investigation and hearing process that protects the safety of victims and promotes accountability. (WAC 132N-126-115 https://app.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=132N-126-115) (ref. 668.46(j)(2)(ii,iii,iv))

Both Accuser and the accused shall receive simultaneous notification in writing as described in WAC 132N-126-140 (https://app.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=132N-126-140) (ref. 668.46(j)(2)(v))

The College is committed to establishing and maintaining a safe work and educational environment. Any act of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking is strictly prohibited in the workplace or on campus.

Clark College is required by the Clery Act to adopt policies and programs aimed at prevention and response to these attacks. Campus Security does not have law enforcement authority so local law enforcement would have any arrest and legal investigative responsibilities. Clark College will address the incidents as violations of the Student Code of Conduct and Title IX. Sexual assault in any form, including acquaintance rape, violates criminal laws and Clark College's standards of conduct. Clark College has instituted procedures to respond to violations of these laws and standards, programs aimed at the prevention of such conduct, and intervention on behalf of the victims.

Campus Security will treat victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking with respect and dignity. Confidentiality is of the utmost importance and Campus Security will assist by providing resources to victims. Campus Security refers victims to the appropriate college and/or local community counseling and other resources devoted to assisting victims. Clark College will assist victims in notifying local law enforcement.

All employees, students, and visitors should immediately report threats, acts of violence that occur at Clark College. Students and visitors should report incidents to Campus Security and/or local law enforcement agencies. Employees may also report such incidents to their supervisor, Campus Security, local law enforcement agencies or Human Resources.

Level 3 Sex Offender Registration


Clark College provides notice to the college community regarding registered Level III sex offenders in accordance with the "Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act" of 2000, which amends the Jacob Wetterling Crimes Against Children and Sexually Violent Offender Registration Act, the Clery Act and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. This act requires institutions of higher education to issue a statement advising the college community where law enforcement information regarding registered sex offenders may be obtained. It also requires a registered sex offender to notify each institution of higher education in the state that they are employed, carries a vocation, or are a student. In the state of Washington, sex offenders who are enrolled in a public or private institution of higher education must also notify the local county sheriff immediately. Pursuant to the Community Protection Act of 1990, the Clark County Sheriff's Office is the lead agency for compiling and maintaining information on sex offenders residing in Clark County. Using this public information to threaten, intimidate or harass sex/kidnap offenders will not be tolerated by law enforcement agencies of Clark County. In addition, any student violating this provision could be subject to the Clark College Student Code of Conduct. (ref. 668.46(b)(12))

Details of this policy can be found in Clark College Admin procedure 527.055 NOTIFICATION REGARDING CONVICTED SEX OFFENDER (https://www.clark.edu/about/governance/public-disclosure-and-records/adminProcedures/500/527/index.php#527055)

Emergency Response and Notification

Emergencies or disasters can happen any time and usually occur with little or no warning. When an emergency occurs at Clark College, effective response and recovery depend on existing levels of preparedness and coordinated response from students, faculty and staff. Everyone should be aware of what to do in an emergency. During a time of emergency, Campus Security and/or a designated College administrator, (Executive Cabinet or Emergency Management Planning Committee (EMPC) member), shall immediately implement the appropriate emergency procedures based on the following priorities: (ref. 668.46(g)(2))

(ref. 668.46(g))

 

Upon confirmation of a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health and safety of students, employees and visitors, Clark College will determine and employ the appropriate communication methods to notify the affected college community. Designated college personnel may include direct observation of a suspected threat to safety, seeking out secondary sources of information, or other means designed to assess the needs for emergency alerts as part of the confirmation process.  Steps taken to confirm an emergency should never cause a significant delay in transmitting emergency information or compromise the safety of those on college property.  For the purposes of this section, designated college personnel will primarily consist of personnel from Campus Security and Facilities Services. (ref. 668.46(g)(4))

Taking into account the safety of the community, Clark College will determine the content of the notification and initiate the appropriate elements of the emergency notification system unless the notification will, in the professional judgment of responsible authorities, compromise efforts to assist victims or to contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency. (ref. 668.46(g)(3))

Examples of circumstances resulting in activation of the college’s mass notifications systems include, but are not limited to:

 

The college’s primary mass notification system (InformaCast) is designed to send emergency notifications through network telephones, computers and common area speakers. Employees must familiarize themselves with the College emergency response protocols to effectively respond to emergency notifications.

 

Clark College may also utilize the RAVE Alert mass notification system and/or the RAVE Guardian smartphone application as secondary means to notify students, faculty and staff of emergency situations. RAVE Alert is designed to broadcast alerts in the form of emails and text messages to subscribed accounts and mobile devices. (ref. 668.46(g)(1))

Training, Testing and Evaluation (ref. 668.46(g)(6))

All employees are required to review emergency protocols on an annual basis.  Emergency Response Guides (indexed booklets that serve as a reference for emergency response protocols) are widely distributed to all college departments, and are located throughout the institution.  Emergency Response Posters provide summary information about emergency protocols and are conspicuously displayed in employee work areas, common areas of all campus buildings and in all instructional areas. (ref. 668.46(g)(6)(ii))

Emergency preparedness drills are published based on schedule that is published annually.  Routine drills include quarterly lock down drills, one of which is “unannounced”, an annual earthquake drill and an annual fire evacuation drill. (ref. 668.46(g)(6)(i))

After each scheduled exercise and actual emergency event, feedback from the college community is solicited as part of the evaluation process of our emergency response protocols.  The received feedback is evaluated by the Emergency Management Planning Committee (EMPC) that will recommend and implement changes designed to improve the preparedness program. (ref. 668.46(g)(6)(iii))

Clark College Emergency Operations Plan (EOP)

The Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) document lays out a detailed and carefully-crafted plan that will be set in motion whenever an emergency reaches proportions that cannot be handled by standard operating procedures.  To request a copy, contact the Emergency Manager at emergencymanager@clark.edu or (360) 992-2449.

Administrative Procedure 521.030 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AND RESPONSE states:

In the event of a natural or human-made emergency, a state of emergency may be declared at the discretion of the College President or designee.  Once a state of emergency has been declared, Clark College will implement its all-hazards Emergency Operations Plan as appropriate for the specific event. The College’s response may include the activation of an Incident Command Post (ICS) or Emergency Operations Center (EOC) in accordance with the National Incident Management System (NIMS). Authority to manage the emergency will be transferred to Incident Command Staff by the College President or designee. During a declared state of emergency, standard or typical lines of reporting may be superseded by a structure that follow NIMS guidelines. Faculty and staff may be asked to support emergency response activities or efforts as needed.  These requests may come from sources outside of the faculty or staff member’s typical chain of command.

Communications with faculty, staff, students, local, state, and federal officials, and the broader community will be conducted in accordance with the established Emergency Communication Plan. All faculty, staff and students are encouraged to sign up with the designated alert system to ensure they receive the earliest possible notification of an event. Faculty, staff and students can register at https://www.getrave.com/login/clark and by texting the word “Guardian” to 67283 from a smartphone or other sms enabled device. (ref. 668.46(g)(5))

At various times, the College will provide emergency response training to faculty, staff and students through a variety of venues (e.g., online, drills, etc.). At a minimum, faculty and staff should familiarize themselves with the Emergency Procedures posted in classrooms, offices and other work areas; keep the yellow Emergency Response Guide in an easily accessible location; and support operational planning necessary for business recovery and continuity.  

In the event of an emergency, faculty and other staff working with students are asked to encourage students to follow the Emergency Procedures and any other response instructions that come from the College. However, faculty and staff are not expected or required to compel students to remain in place. 

In the event of an infectious disease outbreak (e.g., measles, bird flu, etc.) the College will respond in accordance with procedure 521.035 – INFECTIOUS DISEASE RESPONSE.

Community partners in law enforcement, firefighting, emergency dispatch and public health took a proactive role in customizing Clark College's EOP. The plan addresses the main campus and satellite sites. Order of priorities:

Clark College's EOP provides guidance to College personnel and local authorities. It covers management and coordination about any unplanned emergency event. Procedures are flexible to accommodate contingencies of all types and magnitudes. It is a living document that will be evaluated and updated as necessary.

The plan conforms to the National Incident Management System (NIMS), falls under the Washington State Plan, and incorporates guidelines for the Incident Command System.

Depending on the type of emergency or event circumstances, employees and students of the college may be ordered to lockdown, evacuate or shelter in place.

The EOP is maintained and updated as necessary by Clark College's Administrative Services unit. Expertise and advice is contributed by the Environmental Health and Safety Committee and the Emergency Management Planning Committee (EMPC), which also responds in emergencies.

Special Safety Teams at Clark College

Clark College has Emergency Building Coordinators (EBCs) and a Campus Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) that focus on increasing safety during an emergency.

Emergency Building Coordinators (EBCs)
EBC team has learned the college's basic emergency protocols. EBCs are strategically located in every college building, including satellite sites. They can explain emergency protocols and deliver on-the-ground direction during an incident. EBC’s assume a lead role during building evacuations that includes directing evacuees towards designated assembly areas, identifying those who require assistance and providing real-time information to college authorities responsible for managing emergency response.

Emergency Management Partnership Agreements

Clark College has entered into emergency management partnership agreements with the following local partners:

Within each agreement, our partners have committed to support Clark College's efforts to improve, and fully integrate a comprehensive, all-hazards plan for its main campus and off-site locations to include:

 

Missing Student Notification Policy

Clark College does not maintain on-campus housing facilities and, therefore, is not required to have a missing student notification policy. If a Clark College student is reported missing, campus security will assist the investigating law enforcement agency in any way possible. This includes posting notifications on the agency website as well as posting notifications physically on campus. (ref. 668.46(h))

Hate Crimes (ref. 668.46(c)(4))
Any of the offenses reportable under the Clery Act, and any incidents of Larceny-Theft, Simple Assault, Intimidation, Destruction/Damage/Vandalism of Property and other crimes involving bodily injury to any person, in which the victim is intentionally selected because of the actual or perceived race, gender, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, ethnicity, or disability of the victim that are reported to campus security authorities or local police agencies;

Clark College lists the domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking incidents that were reported to campus security authorities or local police agencies.

The Hierarchy Rule (ref. 668.46(c)(9))
In cases that involve multiple offenses, Clark College uses the FBI's Uniform Crime Report
Hierarchy Rule. This rule requires the college to count only the most serious offense
when more than one offense was committed during a single incident. A single incident means
that the offenses were committed at the same time and place. That is, the time interval between the offenses and the distance between the locations where they occurred were insignificant.

Beginning with the most serious offense, the following list shows the hierarchy for Clery Act
reporting:

Murder and Non-negligent Manslaughter
Negligent Manslaughter
Sexual Assault
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Burglary
Motor Vehicle Theft

Exceptions to the Hierarchy Rule include cases where multiple offenses have occurred that involve:

 

Clark College Properties and Clery Geography

Clark College operates within facilities at the following locations throughout Clark County that offer classes and support services (ref. 668.46(c)(10)):

 

Main Campus

1933 Ft. Vancouver Way, Vancouver WA 98663

“Main Campus” encompasses the areas bordered by E.  McLoughlin Blvd, E. Reserve Street, 4th Plain Blvd. and Ft. Vancouver Way and those bordered by Interstate 5, E. McLoughlin Blvd, Ft. Vancouver Way and the property line between Clark College property and the Portland VA Medical Center located at 1601 E. 4th Plain Blvd.  All structures, athletic fields, walkways, green spaces, and parking lots within these borders are considered to be part of Main Campus.

Main Campus Clery Geography

Columbia Tech Center Campus (CTC)

18700 SE Mill Plain Blvd. Vancouver, WA 98683

CTC Campus Clery Geography

Clark College at WSU Vancouver (CCW) 14204 NE Salmon Creek Ave, Vancouver WA 98686

 

CCW is under the jurisdiction of the WSU-Vancouver (WSU-V) Department of Public Safety and will be included in the annual crime report generated by WSU-V and can be found at https://www.vancouver.wsu.edu/safety-plan/annual-security-report. WSU-V statistics are also included in this report.

 

Safety Escort Service

Campus Security Officers are available to provide security escorts to buildings and to parking lots on main campus and CTC during operating hours. Please call 360-992-2133 on main campus and 360-992-6133 at CTC.


At CCW, students can obtain security escorts by contacting the WSU-V Department of Public Safety at 360-546-9001 or paging an officer at 360-690-1527. Escorts at CCW are available weekdays until 11:30 pm and weekends until 7:00 pm.

Daily Crime Log

Campus security maintains a daily case log for the previous 60 days that lists crimes reported to campus security and VPD. The log lists the type of offense, date, case number, general location and disposition of the complaint if known. The log can be accessed on the Clark College Security web site: http://www.clark.edu/student_services/security/daily_crime_log.php.  Individuals can also obtain neighborhood crime information that occurs in the city of Vancouver by accessing the VPD web site at: http://www.cityofvancouver.us/polce/page/crime-map. (ref. 668.46(f))

Immediate Action

All Clark College employees shall immediately report acts of violence and/or any serious threats made against them or witnessed by them to 911 and Security at 360-992-2133. Nothing in this policy relieves a college employee from taking immediate action when the safety or security of employees, students, or members of the general public is threatened and time is critical. 

 

No Retaliation

No one shall be singled out, penalized, or retaliated against in any way for reporting concerns. Clark College will not tolerate retaliation against individuals making good faith reports as provided for in this policy even where the concerns prove ultimately to have been in error. Retaliation may be grounds for disciplinary action. (ref. 668.46(m))

Reported Incidents on or Near College Main Campus Facilities (668.46(b)(1))

 

 

2021

 

2020

 

2019

 

ONC

OCC

NON

 

ONC

OCC

NON

 

ONC

OCC

NON

Criminal Offenses (Count by Occurrence) (2)

Murder/Non-Negligent Manslaughter

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Manslaughter

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Rape

0

0

0

 

0

0

1

 

2

0

0

Fondling

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Incest

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Statutory Rape

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Robbery

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Aggravated Assault

2

0

0

 

0

1

0

 

0

0

0

Burglary

4

0

0

 

1

0

1

 

7

0

0

Motor Vehicle Theft

1

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

5

0

0

Arson

3

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

1

0

0

Arrests for Violations (Count by Individual)

Liquor Laws

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Drug Laws

0

0

0

 

0

1

0

 

0

0

0

Illegal Weapons

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Disciplinary Referrals for Violations

Liquor Laws

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Drug Laws

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Illegal Weapons

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

1

0

0

Relationship Violence and Stalking

Domestic Violence

0

0

0

 

1

0

0

 

0

0

0

Dating Violence

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Stalking

0

0

1

 

0

0

1

 

5

0

1

Hate Related Crimes (Count by Occurrence and Category)

Race

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Ethnicity

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Gender

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Disability

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Religion

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Sexual Orientation

1

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

National Origin

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Gender Identity

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Unfounded Crimes

Total Unfounded Crimes

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

  1. Includes incidents reported to college authorities and to the local law enforcement (VPD).
  2. ONC: On-Campus. This category includes incidents that occurred on the main campus of the college.
  3. OCC: Off-Campus Contiguous. This category includes incidents that occurred on property immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus. This includes incidents that have occurred in Water Works Park (City of Vancouver Parks Department) and reported to the VPD.
  4. NON: Non-Campus Facilities. This category includes incidents that occurred on property owned or controlled by the college that are not considered to be part of any Clark College campus. All crimes within this category are included in the Main Campus statistics.

 

 

Reported Incidents On or Near Columbia Tech Center (CTC) (668.46(b)(1))

 

2021

 

2020

 

2019

 

ONC

OCC

NON

 

ONC

OCC

NON

 

ONC

OCC

NON

Criminal Offenses (Count by Occurrence) (2)

Murder/Non-Negligent Manslaughter

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Manslaughter

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Rape

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Fondling

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Incest

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Statutory Rape

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Robbery

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Aggravated Assault

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

1

0

0

Burglary

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Motor Vehicle Theft

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Arson

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Arrests for Violations (Count by Individual)

Liquor Laws

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Drug Laws

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Illegal Weapons

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Disciplinary Referrals for Violations

Liquor Laws

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Drug Laws

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Illegal Weapons

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Relationship Violence and Stalking

Domestic Violence

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Dating Violence

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Stalking

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Hate Related Crimes (Count by Occurrence and Category)

Race

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Ethnicity

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Gender

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Disability

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Religion

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Sexual Orientation

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

National Origin

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Gender Identity

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Unfounded Crimes

Total Unfounded Crimes

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

Notes to crime statistics:

  1. NON: Non-Campus Facilities. This category includes incidents that occurred on property owned or controlled by the college that are not considered to be part of any Clark College campus. All crimes within this category are included in the Main Campus statistics.
  2. Includes incidents reported to college authorities and to the local law enforcement (VPD).
  3. ONC: On-Campus. This category includes incidents that occurred on the CTC campus.
  4. OCC: Off-Campus Contiguous. This category includes incidents that occurred on property immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus.


WSU-V Department of Public Safety is contracted to provide Facilities and Security Coverage at Clark College at WSU-Vancouver (CCW). The below crimes statistics have been taken from the Washington State University-Vancouver Annual Crime Report. Any Clark College student discipline referrals (drugs, alcohol, weapons) would be listed in the Clark College Main Campus statistics in the Non-Campus section.

Reported Incidents On or Near College Facilities (CCW) (668.46(b)(1))

 

2021

 

2020

 

2019

 

ONC

OCC

NON

 

ONC

OCC

NON

 

ONC

OCC

NON

Part I - Reported

Murder/Non-negligent Manslaughter

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Negligent Manslaughter

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Rape

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Fondling

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Incest

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Statutory Rape

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Robbery

0

0

0

 

1

0

0

 

0

0

0

Burglary

0

0

0

 

3

0

0

 

0

0

0

Arson

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Aggravated Assault

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Motor Vehicle Theft

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

1

0

0

Relationship Violence and Stalking

Domestic Violence

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Dating Violence

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Stalking

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Hate Crimes by Category
[Hate Crimes are define and listed under the Timely Warnings section of this report]

Race

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Ethnicity

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Gender

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Disability

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Religion

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Sexual Orientation

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Part One Crime Totals

4

0

0

 

1

0

0

 

1

0

0

Part II - Reported

Liquor Law Violation

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Drug Abuse Law Violation

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Illegal Weapons Violation

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Part Two Crime Totals

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

NUMBER OF ARRESTS AND CAMPUS DISCIPLINE REFERRALS

Arrests

18 Yrs.  And Over

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

17 Yrs. And Under

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

ARRESTS OR REFERRALS FOR CAMPUS DISCIPLINARY ACTION FOR:

Alcohol Abuse Violations

Arrests

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Referrals

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Drug Abuse Violations

Arrests

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Referrals

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Weapon Possessions/Violations

Arrests

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Referrals

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0


TABLE NOTES

  1. ONC: On Campus: This category includes incidents that occurred on the main campus.
  2. OCC: Off-campus contiguous. This category includes incidents that occurred on public property immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus. The information in this category is provided by the Clark County Sheriff's Department. For additional information on crime statistics in Clark County, please contact the Clark County Sheriff's Department at: (360) 397-2211.
  3. NON: Non-campus facilities. This category includes incidents that occurred on property other than the main campus owned or controlled by the university and used in support of our educational purposes. WSU has no Non-campus facilities at this time.
  4. The F.B.I. defines forcible sex offenses as: rape and attempted rape, forcible sodomy, sexual assault with an object, and forcible fondling.
  5. The F.B.I. defines non-forcible sex offenses as: incest and statutory rape.
  6. The number of persons referred for disciplinary action does not include persons arrested and reported in the arrest categories above.

 

Effective from the 1999 calendar year, the Clery Act requires the reporting of crime statistics for an expanded area beyond WSU Vancouver's campus. The law and accompanying regulations also require these statistics to be shown in specific geographic categories (or venues) as defined below.

Federal regulations define On Campus as any building or property owned or controlled by an institution within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area and used by the institution in direct support of, or in a manner related to, the institution's educational purposes, including residence halls; and any building or property that is within or reasonably contiguous to the said area and is owned by the institution but controlled by another person, is frequently used by students, and supports institutional purposes (such as a food or other retail vendor) 34 CFR 668.46(a).

On campus–residential facilities only is a sub-category of On Campus showing the number of on-campus crimes that took place in dormitories or other residential facilities for students on campus 34 CFR 668.46(c)(4)(ii). NOTE: WSU Vancouver does not have residential facilities or a residential population.

On adjacent public property is defined as all public property, including thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking facilities, that are within the campus, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus      34 CFR 668.46(a).

In or on a non-campus building or property is defined as any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization that is officially recognized by the institution and any building or property owned or controlled by an institution that is used in direct support of, or in relation to, the institution's educational purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution 34 CFR 668.46(a). NOTE: WSU Vancouver has no property meeting this definition.

Hate Crimes: The Clery Act requires the separate reporting, by category of prejudice, of any crime reported in the classifications above and any other crime involving bodily injury that manifests evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the victim's actual or perceived race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, or disability. No hate crimes were reported in the crime classifications in the above table at Washington State University Vancouver from 1998 to 2004.

The University does not record statistics for crimes involving students or student organizations that occur in other law enforcement jurisdictions as part of the Uniform Crime Report. However, the Washington State University Vancouver Department of Public Safety does maintain good communication with local law enforcement and tries to monitor incidents involving students that do occur in other jurisdictions.