2017 Annual Crime/Security Report

2017 Annual Crime/Security Report

Crime and Security Information

In 1998, the Federal Government passed the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act 20 U.S.C. §1092 (f). This law requires that universities and colleges receiving federal funding disclose reported instances of criminal activities on campuses. In addition to the disclosure of campus crime statistics the act requires timely warnings of criminal activity to the campus community as well as the disclosure of various campus policies. For more information on this legislation, please visit the Clery Web Site at https://clerycenter.org/ under Policy & Resources.

Annual Security Report and Disclosure of Crime Statistics

Clark College Security & Safety (Campus Security) prepares this report to comply with the Clery Act. This report is prepared in cooperation with local law enforcement agencies and Student Affairs.

Campus crime, arrest, and referral statistics include those reported to any campus security authority (see below) or local law enforcement agency. Counselors provided by Clark College to students inform their clients of the procedures to report crime to Campus Security and/or law enforcement on a voluntary or confidential basis, should they feel it is in the best interest of their client.

A hard copy printout of this report may be requested by contacting the Campus Security at 360-992-2133.

Campus Security Authority

A campus security authority is a Clery Act-specific term that encompasses four groups of individuals and organizations associated with an institution. 

  1. A campus police department or a campus security department of an institution.
  2. Individuals who have responsibility for campus security but who do not constitute a campus police department or a campus security department.
  3. Any individual or organization specified in an institution’s statement of campus security policy as an individual or organization to which students and employees should report criminal offenses.
  4. An official of an institution who has significant responsibility for student and campus activities, including, but not limited to, student housing, student discipline and campus judicial proceedings.

Clark College Campus Security Authorities

Clark College Properties

Clark College (College) the following locations throughout Clark County that offer classes and limited support services:

Main Campus

1933 Ft. Vancouver Way, Vancouver WA 98663

“Main Campus” encompasses the areas bordered by E.  McLoughlin Blvd, E. Reserve Street, 4th Plain Blvd. and Ft. Vancouver Way and those bordered by Interstate 5, E. McLoughlin Blvd, Ft. Vancouver Way and the property line between Clark College Property and the Portland VA Medical Center located at 1601 E. 4th Plain Blvd.  All structures, athletic fields, walkways, green spaces, and parking lots within these borders are considered to be part of Main Campus. 

Columbia Tech Center Campus (CTC) - 18700 SE Mill Plain Blvd. Vancouver, WA 98683

Clark College Economic and Community Development (ECD) - 500 Broadway St. Suite 200, Vancouver, WA 98660

 Clark College at WSU Vancouver (CCW) 14204 NE Salmon Creek Ave, Vancouver WA 98686

CCW is under the jurisdiction of the WSU-Vancouver (WSU-V) Department of Public Safety and will be included in the annual crime report generated by WSU-V and can be found at https://admin.vancouver.wsu.edu/clery-act/annual-security-report. WSU-V statistics are also included in this report.

Physical Security–Facilities Hours of Use


CTC hours are 7:00 am to 10:00 pm Monday through Thursday, Friday from 7:00 am to 4:00 pm and Saturdays 8:00 am to 5:00 p.m.

Clark College has no resident facilities and buildings are locked by Security when the campus and grounds are closed and/or when the building is not used.

CCW hours are Monday through Thursday from 7:00 am to 9:30 pm, Friday from 7:00 am to 6:00 pm and Saturday from 8:00 am to 6:00 pm.

ECD hours are Monday through Friday 8:30 am to 5:30 pm unless specific classes are scheduled during the evening hours.

Main Campus hours are 6:30 am to 10:30 pm Monday through Thursday and 6:30 am to 6:00 pm on Friday through Sunday.

The Campus Security Director or designee remains in close contact with the Director of Facilities on maintenance requests with regard to security/safety issues for grounds, parking lots and campus buildings. Lighting problems are specifically noted. 

Authority and Jurisdiction of the Campus Security

On main campus, Campus Security is located on the 1st floor of Gaiser Hall. At CTC, the Campus Security office is located on the 1st floor adjacent to the Student Services Information desk. At CCW, the WSU-V Department of Public Safety is located in the Administration Building -VAM 160.

Campus Security is staffed on main campus by a Director of Security & Safety, eight full time Campus Security Officers; and nine part-time Campus Security Officers. Security is available on main campus 24 hours a day/365 days a year. CTC has Campus Security assigned Monday -Thursday from 6:30 am to 10:30 pm, Fridays 7:00 am to 4:00 pm, and Saturdays from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm. CTC is closed on Sundays. ECD has no Campus Security assigned to its location. Non-emergency security related matters at ECD can be referred to main Campus Security (360-992-2133) and requests for emergency and crime matters should be referred to 911. The WSU-V Department of Public Safety is contracted to provide security at CCW.

Campus Security Officers act as first responders for all criminal incidents, provides general patrol of campus facilities and property, investigates collisions, manage traffic safety and parking enforcement.  Campus Security coordinates emergency preparedness planning, and provides crime prevention programs. The department responds to all reports of fire and/or requests for medical aid while working in support of emergency responders such as the Vancouver Police Department (VPD) or Vancouver Fire Department (VFD).

Campus Security Officers do not have the authority to make arrests beyond the authority of a “citizen’s arrest” as defined under RCW 9A.16.020. However, they work closely with state and local law enforcement agencies. Campus Security Officers have the authority to ask individuals for identification and determine if that person has lawful business on College properties. 

Campus Security Officers have authority to enforce all traffic codes of RCW title 46, City of Vancouver traffic code, and the rules and regulations on all property leased, rented, and owned by Clark College. This includes all areas of the Main and CTC Campuses as well as any additional property leased, rented, or owned by Clark College.

Trespass Situations

In the event that an individual or group is disruptive to the good order and/or safe operation of the College, the College President or designee shall have the authority to request such individuals leave College premises; prohibit the entry or withdraw the license, privilege, or permit of any individual or group to enter on or remain upon any portion of a College building. Individuals who persist in disruptive conduct, violate College policies and procedures, or remain upon College premises, may be subject denied access to campus or arrested under RCW 9a.52 BURGLARY AND TRESPASS. College personnel and students involved in disruptive or unlawful conduct shall be subject to appropriate disciplinary sanctions provided by law and College policy.

Campus Security may deny access from the Clark College campus and other College facilities any person determined to be in violation of Washington Administrative Code (WAC), Revised Code of Washington (RCW), Clark College Board Policies and Administrative Procedures, or any person determined to be a disturbance or otherwise violating the Code of Student Conduct. Persons excluded will be given a written trespass warning informing them that they must leave the property and not return, and that any return to Clark College facilities will subject them to arrest for criminal trespass under RCW 9A.52.070 and 080 and WAC 132N-120-065. Campus Security may provide copies of exclusion notices to the VPD on a regular basis to facilitate such prosecution. 

Safety Escort Service

Campus Security Officers are available to provide escorts to buildings and to parking lots on main campus and CTC. Please call 360-992-2133 (main campus) and 360-992-6133 at CTC. Unfortunately, appointments cannot be accommodated.

At CCW, students can obtain escorts by contacting the WSU-V Department of Public Safety at 360-546-9001 or paging an officer at 360-690-1527. Escorts at CCW are available weekdays until 1130 pm and weekends until 7:00 pm.

There is no security escort service at ECD.

Local Law Enforcement Agencies

Campus Security maintains a professional working relationship with the VPD, which has primary jurisdiction over the area(s) that contain all current Clark College properties. All criminal incidents are referred to the VPD. All crime victims and witnesses are strongly encouraged to immediately report any crime to Campus Security as well as the appropriate law enforcement agency. Prompt reporting will ensure timely warning notices on-campus and timely disclosure of crime statistics.

The Clark County Sheriff’s Office (CCSO) has secondary law enforcement jurisdiction on all Clark College properties. As a standard practice, the CCSO does not respond to campus property unless needed for emergency assistance and called by VPD, or for self-initiated activity by CCSO personnel.

The Washington State Patrol (WSP) has secondary law enforcement jurisdiction on all Clark College properties. As a standard practice, the WSP does not respond to campus property unless needed for emergency assistance and called by VPD, or for self-initiated activity by a WSP personnel.

Annual Fire Safety Report

Clark College does not currently maintain any on-campus student housing facilities and does not prepare an Annual Fire Safety Report. 

Off-Campus Criminal Student Conduct

At this time Clark College has no off-campus housing nor does it have fraternity or sorority organizations. Campus Security maintains a close working relationship with local law enforcement. Campus Security will assist local law enforcement with Clark College student issues when requested but Campus Security Officers do not actively monitor off campus, non-college sponsored activities or individuals conduct. 

Missing Student Notification Policy

Clark College does not maintain on-student housing facilities and, therefore, is not required to have a missing student notification policy. If a Clark College student is reported missing, the Campus Security will assist the investigating law enforcement agency in any way possible. This includes posting notifications on the agency website as well as posting notifications physically on campus.

Daily Crime Log

Campus Security maintains a daily case log that lists crimes that are reported to Campus Security and the VPD. The log lists the type of offense, date, case number, general location and disposition of the complaint if known. The log can be accessed on the Clark College Security web site: http://www.clark.edu/student_services/security/daily_crime_log.php Individuals can also obtain neighborhood crime information that occurs in the city of Vancouver by accessing the VPD web site at: http://www.cityofvancouver.us/police/page/crime-map.

Timely Warnings

In the event that a situation arises, either on or off campus, that, in the judgment of the Campus Security Director, or their designee, constitutes an ongoing or continuing threat, a campus wide "timely warning" will be issued. The warning will be issued through the college e-mail system to students, faculty and staff, the College student newspaper "The Independent", and student bulletin boards.


Per the Clery Act, timely warnings can be issued for the following crimes, if (1) the crime is reported to campus security authorities, (2) the crime is determined to pose a serious or continuing threat to Clark College students, faculty and employees, and (3) the crime occurred on campus, in or on non-campus buildings or property owned by Clark College or on public property that is within the campus or immediately adjacent to campus:

Sex offenses (includes forcible sex offenses and non-forcible sex offenses)

A timely warning may be issued for any other crime or incident as deemed necessary or appropriate.

Anyone with information warranting a timely warning should report the circumstances to Campus Security or any Campus Security Authority.

Such warnings and reports shall be provided to students and employees in a manner that is timely, that withholds the names of victims as confidential, and that will aid in the prevention of similar occurrences.

Bystander Intervention

The Clery Act defines bystander intervention as, "Safe and positive options that may be carried out by an individual or individuals to prevent harm or intervene when there is a risk of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking. Bystander intervention includes recognizing situations of potential harm, understanding institutional structures and cultural conditions that facilitate violence, overcoming barriers to intervening, identifying safe and effective intervention options, and taking action to intervene." (34 CFR 668.46(j)(2)(ii))

We all have a responsibility to create a safe, supportive, and inclusive Clark College community. Bystander Intervention involves taking action in a situation when someone needs assistance. This should also include someone who is at medical risk due to using drugs or alcohol, or vulnerable to sexual or domestic/dating partner violence. To actively intervene:

  1. Pay attention to those around you
  2. Be aware that someone is taken advantage of, vulnerable, or in danger – Trust your feelings and react
  3. Take personal responsibility to intervene
  4. Make a decision how to respond appropriately –You don't have to put yourself at risk or make the situation worse
  5. Decide to intervene – take action and intervene at the earliest possible point – this may include:

If you are not able to actively intervene in a situation, consider responding by asking the victim if they need help or assistance, contacting the police/security or seeking out others for help. Most importantly, "If you see something, say/do something!"

Incident Reporting

Immediate Action

All Clark College employees shall immediately report acts of violence and/or any serious threats made against them or witnessed by them to 911 and Security at 360-992-2133. Nothing in this policy relieves a college employee from taking immediate action when the safety or security of employees, students, or members of the general public is threatened and time is critical.

Acts of harassment or abusive behavior, assaults, serious threats, or acts of violence by students shall be reported to the Behavioral Intervention Team

Acts of harassment or abusive behavior, assaults, serious threats, or acts of violence by employees shall be reported to the appropriate supervisor or Human Resources.

Incidents of any type can also be reported to any Campus Security Authority.

Campus Security

Posted in each College building and on campus exterior location maps are lists of essential telephone numbers to call in case of specific emergencies. If a crime is in progress, the VPD can be immediately summoned by calling Emergency 911 (campus phones will dial 9-1-1 direct). From college phones, Campus Security is extension 2133 on main campus and 6133 at CTC. From off-campus or cell phones, the number is 360-992-2133 main campus and 360-992-6133 at CTC. From college desk phones, Campus Security can be contacted by pressing the “Security” button. Officers are on duty 24 hours a day on main campus. Campus Security will accept anonymous reports of crimes and will respond appropriately.

There are four emergency telephone kiosks (blue phones) located in the parking lot of CTC, one blue phone in the Yellow 1 parking lot near the T-Building and one blue phone in the Yellow 2 parking lot near the STEM building.  All blue phones are programmed to call the Camus Security office located on main campus and will default to the 9-1-1 system if not answered by Campus Security within 4 rings.

When an incident is reported to Campus Security, a written record may be generated depending on the nature and extent of the circumstances. Copies of incident reports are provided to appropriate campus departments. Reports can be made available to law enforcement and other outside entities through public records requests. Public records requests must be arranged through the Vice President of Administrative Services' office. Notices dealing with special concerns are periodically printed in the College newspaper, on the College website, and posted on campus bulletin boards.


According to Administrative Policy 527.066 THREAT AND VIOLENCE, All Clark College employees shall immediately report acts of violence and/or any serious threats made against them or witnessed by them to 911 and Security at 360-992-2133. Nothing in this policy relieves a college employee from taking immediate action when the safety or security of employees, students, or members of the general public is threatened and time is critical. 

Reports of a student's criminal conduct or violations of the Student Code of Conduct will be forwarded to the Student Conduct Officer in Student Affairs. Crimes should be reported to Campus Security to ensure that they are included in the annual crime statistics and to assist in preparing and forwarding timely warnings to the college community.

Voluntary Confidential Reporting

If you are the victim of a crime on campus and do not want to pursue action within the Clark College System or the criminal justice system, you may still consider making a confidential report. With your permission, a Campus Security Officer will file a report on the details of the incident without revealing your identity to the public. The purpose of a confidential report is to comply with your wish to keep the matter confidential, while taking steps to ensure the future safety of yourself and others. With such information, the College can keep accurate records of the number of incidents involving students, determine where there is a pattern of crime with regard to a particular location, method, or assailant, and alert the campus community to potential danger. Reports filed in this manner are counted and disclosed in the annual crime statistics.

Behavioral Intervention and Threat Assessment (BITA)

The Clark College Behavioral Intervention and Threat Assessment (BITA) team, under the authority of the Clark College President, exists to provide a proactive approach to distressed student behavior that balances the individual needs of the student, faculty or staff and those of the greater college community. By formalizing an information sharing system, conducting threat assessments, and intervening with students at risk, the BITA team meets regularly to maximize early detection and engagement opportunities. BITA seeks to identify patterns of behavior that indicate possible risk or threat. Through training and education about effective referrals, BITA ensures that services, support, and resources are deployed effectively.

The BITA team consists of representatives from the following areas: Student Affairs, Office for Equity and Diversity, Campus Security, Student Conduct, Disability Support Services and Mental Health Counseling. Employees and students should report concerns about unusual or threatening behavior by students to BITA by submitting a referral form, even if such behavior is not perceived as a direct threat or an immediate danger. If the person shows evidence of immediate harm or self to others call 911 and then Campus Security at 360-992-2133.

Employees and students with concerns regarding serious threats, violence or acts of intimidation by a College employee should refer to Administrative Policy 527.066 Threat and Violence

BITA referral forms can be found at https://apps.clark.edu/bita/.

Policy Statement Addressing Counselor Confidentiality

Clark College presently has no procedures that encourage both pastoral and professional counselors, at their discretion, to inform those they counsel of procedures for reporting crimes voluntarily and confidentially for inclusion in the institution's annual security report and Web based report to the Department of Education. This includes verbal or written encouragement.

Anti-Retaliation

No officer, employee, or agent of Clark College shall retaliate, intimidate, threaten, coerce or otherwise discriminate against any individual for exercising their rights and responsibilities under the Clery Act or Title IX. No one shall be singled out, penalized, or retaliated against in any way for reporting concerns. Clark College will not tolerate retaliation against individuals making good faith reports as provided for in this policy even where the concerns prove ultimately to have been in error. Retaliation may be grounds for disciplinary action.

Weapons on Campus

Administrative Policy 527.020 WEAPONS ON CAMPUS states:

Possession or use of firearms, explosives, dangerous chemicals or other dangerous weapons which can be used to inflict bodily harm or to damage real or personal property is prohibited on the college campus, at any other facilities leased or operated by the college, or at any activity under the administration or sponsorship of the college. Exceptions to this policy are permitted when the weapon is used in conjunction with an approved college instructional program, is carried by a duly constituted law officer, or is otherwise permitted by law. 

Threat and Violence Policy

Serious threats, violence or acts of intimidation, with or without the presence of a weapon, will not be tolerated at Clark College. Violations of Administrative Policy 527.066 THREAT AND VIOLENCE may result in disciplinary action in accordance with collective bargaining agreements or Code of Student Conduct (WAC 132N 121 and including but not limited to possible suspension, termination, expulsion and/or the filing of criminal charges.

This policy applies to all situations involving acts of harassment or abusive behavior, assaults, serious threats, or acts of violence engaged in by any guests or volunteers, all College employees or students (full or part time). This policy applies to any acts of violence or threats made on Clark College property or locations, at Clark College classes and events, or under other circumstances that affect the College's ability to operate.

Clark College is committed to providing faculty, staff, and students with an environment that is safe, secure and free from threats of violence or intimidation. The safety of employees and students is important both to enhance the educational environment that Clark College strives to provide, and to promote a supportive working atmosphere for faculty and staff. The purpose of this policy is to establish a framework for responding to situations involving serious threats, harassment or acts of violence against employees and students in order to minimize the possibility of dangerous situations.

Individuals found engaging in behavior in violation of this policy will be subject to corrective action up to and including termination or expulsion. Conduct or behavior not tolerated by Clark College includes but is not limited to:

  1. Physical conduct that results in harm to people or property.
  2. Acts or threats in any manner made directly or indirectly to intimidate, coerce, or cause fear or harm.
  3. Violation of the weapons policy.
  4. Intimidating conduct or harassment that disrupts the work environment, educational process, or results in fear of personal safety.

Harassment Prohibited

Clark College’s Non-Discrimination and Harassment Policy defines “harassment” as a form of discrimination consisting of physical or verbal conduct that denigrates or shows hostility toward an individual because of their membership in a protected class or their perceived membership in a protected class. Harassment occurs when the conduct is sufficiently severe and/or pervasive and so objectively offensive that it has the effect of altering the terms or conditions of employment or substantially limiting the ability of a student to participate in or benefit from the college’s educational and/or social programs. Petty slights, annoyances, offensive utterances, and isolated incidents (unless extremely serious) typically do not qualify as harassment. Examples of conduct that could rise to the level of discriminatory harassment include but are not limited to the following:

“Protected Class” is defined as persons who are protected under state or federal civil rights laws, including laws that prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, perceived or actual physical or mental disability, pregnancy, genetic information, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, marital status, creed, religion, honorably discharged veteran or military status, or use of a trained guide dog or service animal.

Bias-Based Incident Team

Clark College is committed to providing a safe and bias-free environment for all of our staff, students and visitors.

A bias based incident involves conduct (including words, slurs, graffiti, or actions, explicit, implied or perceived) that violates Clark College's policy prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, creed, disabled veteran status, marital status or Vietnam-era veteran status in its programs and activities. In accordance with established policy, bias-based incidents are not tolerated at Clark College.

Any persons, Clark College students, faculty, staff, and visitors, who witness, become aware of, or are subject to bias based expression should immediately notify 1) Campus Security Director (360-992-2133) and/or the 2) Associate Vice President of Diversity, Equity and inclusion (360-992-2757).

Discrimination and Harassment Grievances

Clark College’s grievance procedure is outlined in WAC 132-300-010 Grievance procedure, which states:

Clark College recognizes its responsibility for investigation, resolution, implementation of corrective measures, and monitoring the educational environment and workplace to stop, remediate, and prevent discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, perceived or actual physical or mental disability, pregnancy, genetic information, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, marital status, creed, religion, honorably discharged veteran or military status, or use of a trained guide dog or service animal, as required by Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972, Sections 504 and 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act and ADA Amendments Act, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act and Washington state's law against discrimination, chapter 49.60 RCW and their implementing regulations. To this end, Clark College has enacted policies prohibiting discrimination against and harassment of members of these protected classes. Any individual found to be in violation of these policies will be subject to disciplinary action up to and including dismissal from the college or from employment.

The responsibility for, and the protection of this commitment, extends to students, faculty, administration, staff, contractors, and those who develop or participate in college programs. It encompasses every aspect of employment and every student and community activity.

Any person who believes she or he has been discriminated against or harassed by Clark College or its employee(s) or agent(s) on the basis of any status listed in subsection (1) of this section, may request informal assistance and/or lodge a formal grievance. If the complaint is against that designee, the complainant should report the matter to the president's office for referral to an alternate designee.

The College President designates investigation of grievances on the basis of race, creed, religion, color, national origin, age, political affiliation, and/or marital status to:  Vice President of Human Resources and Title IX coordinator, Human Resources, Baird administration building (BRD) 133, 360-992-2619. The College President designates investigation of grievances on the basis of sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression to the Vice President of Human Resources.The College President designates investigation of grievances on the basis of any physical, sensory or mental disability, or status as a disabled, or honorably discharged veteran or military status to the Director of Disability Support Services and ADA Compliance Officer.

The presidential designee:

The College encourages the timely reporting of any incidents of discrimination or harassment. Complaints may be submitted in writing or orally. For complainants who wish to submit a written complaint, a formal complaint form is available online at http://www.clark.edu/clark-and-community/about/policies-procedures/grievance_procedure.php. Hardcopies of the complaint form are available at the following locations on campus: Office of Diversity and Equity, Gaiser Hall (GHL) 214; Student Affairs Office, Gaiser Hall (GHL) 204; or Human Resources, Baird Administration building (BRD) 133.


Drug and Alcohol Abuse Policy

The College maintains a drug-free environment and campus in accordance with Federal and State policies. Prohibited acts include, but are not limited to:

  1. Furnishing, purchasing, sale, possession, or consumption of alcoholic beverages (as defined by federal or state law) on College-owned or controlled property, or at a College or student organization supervised function. When these acts occur with the prior permission of the Board of Trustees or its authorized designee and under a permit issued by the State of Washington Liquor Control Board or its designee, they shall not constitute a violation of this provision. Being demonstrably under the influence of alcoholic beverages is a violation in any case. Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 132 N 121-060 (10) prohibits the "Use, possession, delivering, selling or being under the influence of alcoholic beverages, (except at sanctioned events approved by the college president or designee and in compliance with state law) or public intoxication".
  2. Possession, consumption, or furnishing of any narcotic or dangerous drug, or being demonstrably under the influence of drugs as defined in Chapter 69.41 RCW as now law or hereinafter amended, except when use or possession is prescribed by an authorized individual under that statute. The possession, sale, manufacture or distribution of any controlled substance is illegal under both state and/or federal laws. Student discipline can be imposed for violation of WAC 132 N-121-060 (11) Use, possession, delivering, selling or being under the influence of legend drugs, including anabolic steroids, narcotic or any other controlled substance, except upon valid prescription by a licensed health care professional or practitioner.

Student discipline can be imposed for violation of the above alcohol policy. The state of Washington sets 21 as the minimum age to purchase, possess and consume any alcoholic beverage. Campus Security has no law enforcement authority and violations of the law would be addressed by the appropriate law enforcement agency. Students violating the Student Code of Conduct regarding alcohol use or possession will be referred to the Student Conduct Officer.

Policy on Illegal Drugs

Clark College has been designated "Drug Free". The possession, sale, manufacture or distribution of any controlled substance is illegal under both state and/or federal laws. Employees are governed by Administrative Policy 615.017 DRUG FRE WORKPLACE, which states:

  1. Any activities involving the use, possession, distribution, or sale of alcohol, unauthorized prescription drugs, controlled substances, or drug paraphernalia at College facilities are prohibited. Any exceptions must be approved by the College president in accordance with Administrative Procedure 510.040.
  2. Employees will report to work in a fit condition, unaffected by alcohol, controlled substances, or unauthorized prescription drugs. Employees will not use alcohol, controlled substances, or unauthorized prescription drugs during working hours or while in paid standby status.
  3. Employees will not utilize the College’s equipment, facilities, worksites, or properties for prohibited activities.
  4. When there is a reasonable cause to believe that an employee’s work performance is affected by alcohol, controlled substances, authorized or unauthorized prescription drugs, Clark College may relieve the employee of duty, direct that the employee be tested for alcohol and controlled substances, and provide transportation to the employee’s personal residence. Such incidents will be documented and reported to the associate vice president of human resources and the appropriate Executive Cabinet member for further action, which may include disciplinary action.
  5. Employees will not operate a state-owned, rented, or privately-owned vehicle while performing official duties if their performance is affected by alcohol, controlled substances, or unauthorized prescription drugs.
  6. Employees using a prescription or non-prescription drug, which they believe may impair job performance, will inform their supervisor of such drug use. For the safety of all, supervisors may require employees to disclose use of prescription and non-prescription medication and provide information on potential job impacts. Employees whose work performance is temporarily impacted by prescription and non-prescription drugs may be reassigned productive alternate work if available or be required to take leave.
  7. Employees convicted of a violation of a criminal drug statute occurring in the workplace must notify their immediate supervisor within five days of their conviction. Within 30 days of this notification, the College may impose appropriate disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal, and/or require that the employee satisfactorily complete an approved substance abuse rehabilitation program.
  8. If at any time driving is a job assignment, employees will immediately notify their supervisor in writing of any driving citations involving controlled substances or alcohol and any convictions that result from the citations.
  9. Employees must submit to alcohol and controlled substance testing when required by this procedure (Administrative Procedure 515.017). A refusal to test is considered the same as a positive test.
  10. All employees will comply with these rules, and those found to be in violation will be subject to corrective/disciplinary action according to appropriate CBA’s, WAC’s, or College procedures.  Disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal, may be considered for any violation consistent with the appropriate collective bargaining agreement.

 

Students are governed by WAC 132N-125-035 Prohibited Student Conduct § (10) alcohol, drug and tobacco violations, which states;

(a) Alcohol. The use, possession, delivery, sale, or being visibly under the influence of any alcoholic beverage, except as permitted by law and applicable college policies.

(b) Marijuana. The use, possession, delivery, sale, or being visibly under the influence of marijuana or the psychoactive compounds found in marijuana and intended for human consumption, regardless of form. While state law permits the recreational use of marijuana, federal law prohibits such use on college premises or in connection with college activities.

(c) Drugs. The use, possession, delivery, sale, or being under the influence of any legend drug, including anabolic steroids, androgens, or human growth hormones as defined in chapter 69.41RCW, or any other controlled substance under chapter 69.50 RCW, except as prescribed for a student's use by a licensed practitioner.

(d) Tobacco, electronic cigarettes, and related products. Consistent with its efforts to promote wellness, fitness, and a campus environment conducive to work, study, and activities for staff, students, and the public, Clark College maintains a tobacco-free campus. The use of tobacco, electronic cigarettes, and related products in any building owned, leased, or operated by the college or in any location is prohibited. "Related products" include, but are not limited to, cigarettes, pipes, bidi, clove cigarettes, water pipes, hookahs, chewing tobacco, and snuff.


Violators are subject to college disciplinary action from the Student Conduct office and criminal prosecution fines and imprisonment through local, state or federal law enforcement agencies. 

Sexual Misconduct Prohibited

The term “sexual misconduct” includes sexual harassment, sexual intimidation, and sexual violence, as defined by Clark College Code of Student Conduct (WAC 132N-125-035 (14)).

(a) Sexual harassment. The term "sexual harassment" means unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature, including unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal, nonverbal, or physical conduct of a sexual nature that is sufficiently serious as to deny or limit, and that does deny or limit, based on sex, the ability of a student to participate in or benefit from the college's educational program or that creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment for other campus community members.

(b) Sexual intimidation. The term "sexual intimidation" incorporates the definition of "sexual harassment" and means threatening or emotionally distressing conduct based on sex including but not limited to, nonconsensual recording of sexual activity or the distribution of such recording.

(c) Sexual violence. "Sexual violence" is a type of sexual discrimination and harassment. Nonconsensual sexual intercourse, nonconsensual sexual contact, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking are all types of sexual violence.

(i) Nonconsensual sexual intercourse is any sexual intercourse (anal, oral, or vaginal), however slight, with any object, by a person upon another person, that is without consent and/or by force. Sexual intercourse includes anal or vaginal penetration by a penis, tongue, finger, or object, or oral copulation by mouth to genital contact or genital to mouth contact.

(ii) Nonconsensual sexual contact is any intentional sexual touching, however slight, with any object, by a person upon another person that is without consent and/or by force. Sexual touching includes any bodily contact with the breasts, groin, mouth, or other bodily orifice of another individual, or any other bodily contact in a sexual manner.

(iii) Domestic violence includes asserted violent misdemeanor and felony offenses committed by the victim's current or former spouse, current or former cohabitant, person similarly situated under domestic or family law, or anyone else protected under domestic or family violence law.

(iv) Dating violence means violence by a person who has been in a romantic or intimate relationship with the victim. Whether there was such a relationship will be gauged by its length, type, and frequency of interaction.

(v) Stalking means intentional and repeated harassment or following of another person, which places that person in reasonable fear that the perpetrator intended to injure, intimidate, or harass that person. Stalking also includes instances where the perpetrator knows or reasonably should know that the person is frightened, intimidated, or harassed, even if the perpetrator lacks such intent.

(vi) Consent: Knowing, voluntary and clear permission by word or action, to engage in mutually agreed upon sexual activity. Each party has the responsibility to make certain that the other has consented before engaging in the activity. For consent to be valid, there must be at the time of the act of sexual intercourse or sexual contact actual words or conduct indicating freely given agreement to have sexual intercourse or sexual contact.

Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Stalking Policy and Procedures

Sexual assault means an offense classified as a forcible or non-forcible sex offense under the uniform crime reporting system of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Victims of a sex offense, domestic violence, dating violence or stalking at Clark College's first priority should be to seek a place of safety. They should then obtain necessary medical treatment. Campus Security strongly encourages a victim to report the incident in a timely manner. Time is a critical factor for the collection and preservation of evidence. Victims should contact local law enforcement by dialing 9-1-1 immediately and/or contacting Campus Security at 360-992-2133 (from campus phones extension 2133; 360-992-6133 at CTC). If the victim contacts Campus Security first, they will immediately notify the appropriate law enforcement agency. Filing a police report does not obligate the victim to prosecute. Clark College has no law enforcement authority and criminal prosecution is the responsibility of local law enforcement.

Victims should not attempt to clean themselves or tamper with any evidence until the proper law enforcement agency can be contacted. Victims should not take showers, use a tampon, or change clothing until the appropriate law enforcement agency is contacted and an incident report and medical examination are completed. The clothing and examination by a qualified physician are important evidence that should be preserved to prove that a sexual assault has occurred and to help with the successful prosecution of the offender. Victims should also keep any text messages, emails, and voicemail messages etc. as evidence to provide law enforcement and/or campus security. This evidence can also assist victims in obtaining the appropriate protection order. Victims have the option of contacting the VPD and/or the Campus Security. If Campus Security is contacted first, they will assist in notifying the proper law enforcement and medical authorities.

Victims of the above offenses may decide to have the incident investigated through the criminal justice system and/or the Student Conduct process. The victim also has the right to decline to notify local authorities or have the incident investigated. If the victim does not want the incident investigated it will be documented and added to the yearly crime statistics as required by the Clery Act. A college representative (such as Campus Security, Student Affairs, Title IX Coordinator etc.) can guide the victim through the various options and provide assistance if requested by the victim. Various counseling options are available through the College's Health Services. Counseling and support services (24 hours) outside the college can be obtained through the YWCA at 1-800-695-0501 or 360-696-0167.

Sex offense educational materials are available in Health Services, Campus Security and Student Services. After an alleged sex offense, academic change options may be discussed with the College's counseling staff. Disciplinary procedures and sanctions for sex offenses are prescribed in the Code of Student Conduct or employee contracts/personnel rules, as applicable. The College's Health Services (campus extension x2264 and is located in Health Sciences (HSC), room 124. Counseling services and/or referrals are available in these offices.

Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Stalking Policy and Response

Clark College will not tolerate sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking in the workplace or on campus. The College is committed to establishing and maintaining a safe work and educational environment.

Clark College is required by the Clery Act to adopt policies and programs aimed at prevention and response to these attacks. Campus Security does not have law enforcement authority so local law enforcement would have any arrest and legal investigative responsibilities. Clark College will address the incidents as violations of the Student Code of Conduct and Title IX. Sexual assault in any form, including acquaintance rape, violates criminal laws and Clark College's standards of conduct and will not be tolerated. Clark College has instituted procedures to respond to violations of these laws and standards, programs aimed at the prevention of such conduct, and intervention on behalf of the victims.

Campus Security will treat victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking with respect and dignity. Confidentiality is of the utmost importance and Campus Security will assist by providing resources to victims. Campus Security refers victims to the appropriate college and/or local community counseling and other resources devoted to assisting victims. Clark College will assist victims in notifying local law enforcement.

All employees, students, and visitors should immediately report threats, acts of violence that occur at Clark College. Students and visitors should report incidents to Campus Security and/or local law enforcement agencies. Employees may also report such incidents to their supervisor, Campus Security, local law enforcement agencies or Human Resources.

Level 3 Sex Offender Registration


Clark College provides notice to the college community regarding registered Level III sex offenders in accordance with the "Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act" of 2000, which amends the Jacob Wetterling Crimes Against Children and Sexually Violent Offender Registration Act, the Clery Act and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. This act requires institutions of higher education to issue a statement advising the college community where law enforcement information regarding registered sex offenders may be obtained. It also requires a registered sex offender to notify each institution of higher education in the state that they are employed, carries a vocation, or are a student. In the state of Washington, sex offenders who are enrolled in a public or private institution of higher education must also notify the local county sheriff immediately. Pursuant to the Community Protection Act of 1990, the Clark County Sheriff's Office is the lead agency for compiling and maintaining information on sex offenders residing in Clark County. Using this public information to threaten, intimidate or harass sex/kidnap offenders will not be tolerated by law enforcement agencies of Clark County. In addition any student violating this provision could be subject to the Clark College Student Code of Conduct.

The Campus Security Director is responsible for providing notice to the College community regarding registered sex offenders as outlined in Administrative Policy 527.055 NOTIFICATION REGARDING SEX OFFENDER. According to that policy:

Upon notification by a law enforcement agency of the possible enrollment and/or identified presence of a convicted Level 3 sex offender, the vice president of administrative services, the vice president of student affairs, and the director of security/safety will meet and jointly determine the level of risk to the College community posed by the offender and the level of notification necessary. The following notification procedures will be invoked:
a. Director of security/safety will notify the offender that his/her identity and relevant and necessary information will be released to the College community.
b. Director of security/safety will notify the College through the campus master email list with a link to the sex offender page on the College website for more information.
c. Vice president of student affairs will notify all students via the student email system with a link to the sex offender page on the College website for more information.
d. The "Independent" or other appropriate means of communication will be used to notify the College student community of the presence of the Level 3 offender.
e. Only the information that is relevant and necessary will be supplied by the College to the College community.  Requests for additional information will be referred to the appropriate law enforcement agency.
f. At each Security Department office (main campus and CTC), a folder that includes the offender’s photo and criminal information sheet will be made accessible to the public. It is the responsibility of any satellite location to maintain their own information binder.
g. Director of security/safety will notify officials at Hudson’s Bay High School and any other appropriate agencies.
h. Director of security/safety will notify instructor(s) of the identity of any Level 3 sex offender who is registered in their class.

Violence Against Women's Act (VAWA)

The Violence Against Women's Act Pub.L.103-322 (1994) (VAWA) has imposed additional reporting requirements. The Clery Act requires annual reporting of statistics for various criminal offenses, including forcible and non-forcible sex offenses and aggravated assault. The VAWA provision adds domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking to the categories. If the incident was reported to a campus security authority or local police agency, it must be reported under Clery.

Domestic Violence

Domestic Violence is defined as a felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed by a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim; by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common; by a person who is cohabitating with, or has cohabitated with, the victim as a spouse or intimate partner; by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred; by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.

Under Washington State law “Domestic Violence” is defined in RCW 26.50.010(3).

Dating Violence

Dating Violence is defined as violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim. The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. For the purposes of this definition, dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse. Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.

Under Washington State law “Dating relationship" in defined in RCW 26.50.010(2).

Stalking

Stalking is defined as engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others or suffer substantial emotional distress.

For the purposes of this definition, Course of Conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about a person, or interferes with a person’s property. Reasonable Person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim. Substantial Emotional Distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.

Under Washington State law “Stalking” is defined in RCW 9A.46.110.

Clark College Disciplinary Procedures for Allegations of Sexual Misconduct

According to WAC 132N 125 200 Supplemental sexual misconduct procedures.

Both the respondent and the complainant in cases involving allegations of sexual misconduct shall be provided the same procedural rights to participate in student discipline matters, including the right to participate in the initial disciplinary decision-making process and to appeal any disciplinary decision.

Application of the following procedures is limited to code of student conduct proceedings involving allegations of sexual misconduct by a student. In such cases, these procedures shall supplement the student disciplinary procedures in WAC 132N-125-005 through 132N-125-145. In the event of conflict between the sexual misconduct procedures and the student disciplinary procedures, the sexual misconduct procedures shall prevail.

WAC 132N-125-205 Supplemental definitions shall apply for purposes of code of student conduct proceedings involving allegations of sexual misconduct by a student:

(1) A "complainant" is an alleged victim of sexual misconduct, as defined in subsection (2) of this section.

(2) "Sexual misconduct" is prohibited sexual- or gender-based conduct by a student including, but not limited to:

(a) Sexual activity for which clear and voluntary consent has not been given in advance;

(b) Sexual activity with someone who is incapable of giving valid consent because, for example, she or he is underage, sleeping, or otherwise incapacitated due to alcohol or drugs;

(c) Sexual harassment;

(d) Sexual violence which includes, but is not limited to, sexual assault, domestic violence, intimate violence, and sexual- or gender-based stalking; and

(e) Nonphysical conduct such as sexual- or gender-based digital media stalking, sexual- or gender-based online harassment, sexual- or gender-based cyberbullying, nonconsensual recording of a sexual activity, and nonconsensual distribution of a recording of a sexual activity.

WAC 132N-125-210 Supplemental complaint process shall apply with respect to complaints or other reports of alleged sexual misconduct by a student:

(1) The college's Title IX coordinator or designee shall investigate complaints or other reports of alleged sexual misconduct by a student. Investigations will be completed in a timely manner and the results of the investigation shall be referred to the student conduct officer for disciplinary action.

(2) Informal dispute resolution shall not be used to resolve sexual misconduct complaints without written permission from both the complainant and the respondent. If the parties elect to mediate a dispute, either party shall be free to discontinue mediation at any time. In no event shall mediation be used to resolve complaints involving allegations of sexual violence.

(3) College personnel will honor requests to keep sexual misconduct complaints confidential to the extent this can be done without unreasonably risking the health, safety, and welfare of the complainant or other members of the college community or compromising the college's duty to investigate and process sexual harassment and sexual violence complaints.

(4) The student conduct officer, prior to initiating disciplinary action, will make a reasonable effort to contact the complainant to discuss the results of the investigation and possible disciplinary sanctions and/or conditions, if any, that may be imposed upon the respondent if the allegations of sexual misconduct are found to have merit.

(5) The student conduct officer, on the same date that a disciplinary decision is served on the respondent, will serve a written notice informing the complainant whether the allegations of sexual misconduct were found to have merit and describing any disciplinary sanctions and/or conditions imposed upon the respondent for the complainant's protection, including disciplinary suspension or dismissal of the respondent. The notice will also inform the complainant and respondent of their appeal rights. If protective sanctions and/or conditions are imposed, the student conduct officer shall make a reasonable effort to contact the complainant to ensure prompt notice of the protective disciplinary sanctions and/or conditions imposed upon the respondent for the complainant's protection is given. 

WAC 132N-125-045 Disciplinary sanctions-Terms-Conditions outlines the disciplinary sanctions that may be imposed upon students found to have violated the code of student conduct. Depending upon the misconduct, more than one sanction may be required. Other than college expulsion or revocation or withholding of a degree, disciplinary sanctions are not made part of the student's academic record, but are part of the student's disciplinary record. Violation of any term or condition of any disciplinary sanction constitutes a new violation and may subject the student to additional sanctions.

(1) Disciplinary warning. A verbal statement to a student that there is a violation and that continued violation may be cause for further disciplinary action.

(2) Written reprimand. Notice in writing that the student has violated one or more terms of this code of conduct and that continuation of the same or similar behavior may result in more severe disciplinary action.

(3) Disciplinary probation. Formal action placing specific conditions and restrictions upon the student's continued attendance depending upon the seriousness of the violation and which may include a deferred disciplinary sanction. If the student subject to a deferred disciplinary sanction is found in violation of any college rule during the time of disciplinary probation, the deferred disciplinary sanction, which may include, but is not limited to, a suspension or a dismissal from the college, shall take effect immediately without further review. Any such sanction shall be in addition to any sanction or conditions arising from the new violation. Probation may be for a limited period of time or may be for the duration of the student's attendance at the college.

(4) Disciplinary suspension. Dismissal from the college and from the student status for a stated period of time. There will be no refund of tuition or fees for the quarter in which the action is taken.

(5) Dismissal. The revocation of all rights and privileges of membership in the college community and exclusion from the campus and college-owned or controlled facilities without any possibility of return. There will be no refund of tuition or fees for the quarter in which the action is taken.

 Disciplinary terms and conditions that may be imposed in conjunction with the imposition of a disciplinary sanction include, but are not limited to, the following:

(1) Educational sanction. The college may require the student to complete an educational activity or experience directly related to the violation committed, at the student's expense.

(2) Professional evaluation. Referral for drug, alcohol, psychological, or medical evaluation by an appropriately certified or licensed professional may be required. The student may choose the professional within the scope of practice and with the professional credentials as defined by the college. The student will sign all necessary releases to allow the college access to any such evaluation. The student's return to college may be conditioned upon compliance with recommendations set forth in such a professional evaluation. If the evaluation indicates that the student is not capable of functioning within the college community, the student will remain suspended until future evaluation recommends that the student is capable of reentering the college and complying with the rules of conduct.

(3) Not in good standing. A student may be deemed "not in good standing" with the college. If so, the student shall be subject to the following restrictions:

(a) Ineligible to hold an office in any student organization recognized by the college or to hold any elected or appointed office of the college.

(b) Ineligible to represent the college to anyone outside the college community in any way, including representing the college at any official function, or any forms of intercollegiate competition or representation.

(4) Restitution or monetary fine. Reimbursement for damage to or misappropriation of property, or for injury to persons, or for reasonable costs incurred by the college in pursuing an investigation or disciplinary proceeding. This may take the form of monetary reimbursement, appropriate service, monetary fine, or other compensation.

(5) Hold on transcript or registration. This is a temporary measure restricting release of a student's transcript or access to registration. Upon satisfactory completion of the conditions of the sanction, the hold is released.

(6) Revocation of admission or degree. Admission to or a degree awarded from the college may be revoked for fraud, misrepresentation, or other violation of standards of conduct for students in obtaining the degree, or for other serious violations committed by a student prior to graduation.

(7) Withholding degree. The college may withhold awarding a degree otherwise earned until the completion of the process set forth in this chapter, including the completion of all sanctions imposed.

(8) No trespass order. A student may be restricted from college property based on his/her misconduct.

(9) No contact order. A prohibition of direct or indirect physical, verbal, or written contact (including electronic communication) with another individual or group.

Standard of Proof

The standard of proof in student sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking investigations is a preponderance of the evidence as outlined in WAC 132N-125-105(5) Appeal from disciplinary action.  For the purposes of this section “preponderance of the evidence” exists where it is determined more likely than not that the allegation did occur.

Programs to Prevent Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, and Stalking

According to the VAWA Amendments to the Clery Act, these programs are defined as “comprehensive, intentional, and integrated programming, initiatives, strategies, and campaigns intended to end dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and staking that are culturally relevant, inclusive of divers communities and identities, sustainable, responsive to community needs, and informed by research or assessed for value, effectiveness, or outcome; and consider environmental risk and protective factors as they occur on the individual, relationship, institutional, community, and societal levels” (Clery Center for Security on Campus, 2013). 

Awareness Programs are defined as “community-wide or audience specific programming, initiatives and strategies that increase audience knowledge and share information and resources to prevent violence, promote safety, and reduce perpetrations” (Clery Center for Security on Campus, 2013).

Ongoing prevention and awareness campaigns are defined as “programming, initiatives, and strategies that are sustained over time and focus on increasing understanding of topics relevant to and skills for addressing dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking, using a range of strategies with audiences throughout the institution” (Clery Center for Security on Campus, 2013).

Primary prevention programs are defined as “programming, initiatives, and strategies informed by research or assessed for value, effectiveness, or outcome that are intended to stop dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking before they occur through the promotion of positive and healthy behaviors that foster health, mutually respectful relationships and sexuality, encourage safe bystander intervention, and seek to change behavior and social norms in health and safe direction” (Clery Center for Security on Campus, 2013).

Clark College is committed to providing these prevention programs and awareness campaigns to all members of our community.  Clark College is a community that values each individual, fosters inclusion, and cares about the well-being, health, and safety of each member.  As such, beginning in Fall 2015, Clark implemented online courses that provide education for all of our members (faculty, staff, and students alike) on the important issues surrounding sexual misconduct, VAWA, and Title IX.  Training is completed on an annual basis.  Examples of offered courses include:   Bridges: Building a Supportive Community, focuses on Title IX and the Campus SaVE Act and provides information on consent, relationship violence, sexual assault, sexual harassment, protecting students, and employee’s role as a responsible employee.  The student online course, Think About It: Campus SaVE, focuses on sexual misconduct including consent, sexual assault, and domestic/dating violence, along with information on bystander intervention, how to help a friend, and campus and community resources. 

Clark College also offers on and off campus resources to student who may be impacted by sexual misconduct; please visit the Title IX webpage @ http://www.clark.edu/clark-and-community/about/policies-procedures/title-IX/index.php) and the Resource Guide for Survivors of Sexual Misconduct.

Crime Prevention Education and Security Awareness

The Campus Security Director participates in special and general student orientations each quarter to present to incoming students information on personal safety, crime prevention, reporting, and campus regulations. The Campus Security Director and/or designee, meets with particular campus departments and personnel to assist with planning related to crime prevention, safety, and security. The Campus Security Director is available upon request to discuss similar issues with interested campus groups or student organizations, and meets with participants in off-campus student programs. VPD, CCSO and the Department of Corrections (DOC) also provide presentations to the college community.

Crime prevention information can also be obtained by accessing the VPD web site at http:///www.cityofvancouver.us/police/page/crime-prevention.

A common theme of all awareness and crime prevention programs is to encourage students and employees to be aware and responsible for their own security and the security of others. Students and employees must also be aware of their responsibility to protect their personal property and property belonging to the college. Information is disseminated to students and employees through crime prevention awareness pamphlets, e mails, security alert posters, displays and articles in the student newspaper. When time is of the essence, information is released to the college community through emergency notifications, timely warnings, and security alerts posted prominently throughout campus and communications methods. 

Campus Security maintains a bulletin board on main campus. Hard copies of the crime statistics for main campus, CTC and WSU-Vancouver for the past 3 years are available at the Lost and Found desk, which is located in Gaiser Hall

Risk Reduction

The Clery Act defines "risk reduction" as, "Options designed to decrease perpetration and bystander inaction, and to increase empowerment for victims in order to promote safety and to help individuals and communities address conditions that facilitate violence." (34 CFR 668.46(j)(2)(v))

If you become a victim of a crime, it is not your fault. Perpetrators, not victims, are responsible for dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, bullying and other crimes.
You CAN take some actions that may increase your safety and decrease the chances you will be targeted or victimized.

With regard to relationships:

More general safety tips:

Emergency Response and Notification

Emergencies or disasters can happen any time and usually occur with little or no warning. When an emergency occurs at Clark College, effective response and recovery depend on existing levels of preparedness and coordinated response from students, faculty and staff. Everyone should be aware of what to do in an emergency. During a time of emergency, Campus Security and/or a designated College administrator, (Executive Cabinet or Emergency Management Planning Committee (EMPC) member), shall immediately implement the appropriate emergency procedures based on the following priorities:

Upon confirmation of a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health and safety of students, employees and visitors occurring on any of the campuses, Clark College will determine and employ the appropriate communication methods to notify the affected college community immediately and without delay. Confirmation of significant emergencies will require direct investigation by appropriate college personnel. Taking into account the safety of the community, Clark College will determine the content of the notification and initiate the appropriate elements of the emergency notification system unless the notification will, in the professional judgment of responsible authorities, compromise efforts to assist victims or to contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency.

The College mass notification system (Informacast) is designed to send emergency notifications through network telephones, computers and common area speakers. Employees must familiarize themselves with the College emergency response protocols to effectively respond to emergency notifications. Clark College may also utilize the RAVE Alert mass notification system as a secondary means to notify students, faculty and staff of emergency situations. RAVE Alert is designed to broadcast alerts in the form of emails and text messages to subscribed accounts and mobile devices. RAVE Alert is an opt-in notification system where individual users must voluntarily register to receive notifications. There is no cost to the user for this service.

Faculty, staff and students are strongly encouraged to enroll in the RAVE Alert system. Go to www.getrave.com, click on the "Register" button, and log in with your Clark College network username and password. Follow instructions to set up your mobile phone to receive emergency text messages.

Situations that may warrant a message being sent via Rave or Informacast are school closings, weather emergencies and crimes occurring on or around campuses, etc. The most common emergencies that would result in a RAVE Alert include:

College Administration will issue and re-issue campus-wide emergency lockdown messages via the mass notification system.

Clark College Emergency Operations Plan (EOP)

Since the tragedy at Virginia Tech in 2007, Clark College - like other colleges and universities across the country - has taken concrete actions to increase security. Examples: New classroom door locks, enhanced signage and a new phone system that allows emergency alerts to be broadcast instantly across the college.

The Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) document lays out a detailed and carefully-crafted plan that will be set in motion whenever an emergency reaches proportions that cannot be handled by standard operating procedures.  To request a copy, contact the Emergency Manager at emergencymanager@clark.edu or (360) 992-2449.

Administrative Policy 521.030 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AND RESPONSE states:

In the event of a natural or human-made emergency, a state of emergency may be declared at the discretion of the College President or designee.  Once a state of emergency has been declared, Clark College will implement its all-hazards Emergency Operations Plan as appropriate for the specific event. The College’s response may include the activation of an Incident Command Post (ICS) or Emergency Operations Center (EOC) in accordance with the National Incident Management System (NIMS). Authority to manage the emergency will be transferred to Incident Command Staff by the College President or designee. During a declared state of emergency, standard or typical lines of reporting may be superseded by a structure that follow NIMS guidelines. Faculty and staff may be asked to support emergency response activities or efforts as needed.  These requests may come from sources outside of the faculty or staff member’s typical chain of command.

Communications with faculty, staff, students, local, state, and federal officials, and the broader community will be conducted in accordance with the established Emergency Communication Plan. All faculty, staff and students are encouraged to sign up with the designated alert system to ensure they receive the earliest possible notification of an event. Faculty, staff and students can register at https://www.getrave.com/login/clark.

At various times, the College will provide emergency response training to faculty, staff and students through a variety of venues (e.g., online, drills, etc.). At a minimum, faculty and staff should familiarize themselves with the Emergency Procedures posted in classrooms, offices and other work areas; keep the yellow Emergency Response Guide in an easily accessible location; and support operational planning necessary for business recovery and continuity.  

In the event of an emergency, faculty and other staff working with students are asked to encourage students to follow the Emergency Procedures and any other response instructions that come from the College. However, faculty and staff are not expected or required to compel students to remain in place. 

In the event of an infectious disease outbreak (e.g., measles, bird flu, etc.) the College will respond in accordance with policy 521.035 – INFECTIOUS DISEASE RESPONSE.

Local Vancouver partners in law enforcement, firefighting, emergency dispatch and public health took a proactive role in customizing Clark College's EOP. The plan addresses the main campus and satellite sites. Order of priorities:

Clark College's EOP provides guidance to College personnel and local authorities. It covers management and coordination about any unplanned emergency event. Procedures are flexible to accommodate contingencies of all types and magnitudes. It is a living document that will be evaluated and updated as necessary.

The plan conforms to the National Incident Management System (NIMS), falls under the Washington State Plan, and incorporates guidelines for the Incident Command System.

Depending on the type of emergency or event circumstances, employees and students of the college may be ordered to lockdown, evacuate or shelter in place.

The EOP is maintained and updated as necessary by Clark College's Administrative Services unit. Expertise and advice is contributed by the Environmental Health and Safety Committee and the Emergency Management Planning Committee (EMPC), which also responds in emergencies.

Special Safety Teams at Clark College

Clark College has several special teams focused on safety: Emergency Building Coordinators (EBCs), Campus Community Emergency Response Team (CERT); and the Crisis Intervention Management Team (CIMT).

Emergency Building Coordinators (EBCs)
EBC team has learned the college's basic emergency protocols. They are outfitted with vests, emergency kits, and walkie-talkies at each building. EBCs are strategically located in every college building, including satellite sites. They can explain emergency protocols and deliver on-the-ground direction during an incident. EBC’s assume a lead role during building evacuations that includes directing evacuees towards designated assembly areas, identifying those who require assistance and providing real-time information to college authorities responsible for managing emergency response.

Campus Community Emergency response Team (CERT)
Working alongside EBCs are members of the College's Campus CERT team. CERT members have received training from local fire service agencies and are qualified to assist with basic emergency response. Examples include safety awareness, basic medical triage and light search and rescue.

Emergency Management Partnership Agreements

Clark College has entered into emergency management partnership agreements with the following local partners:

Within each agreement, our partners have committed to support Clark College's efforts to improve, and fully integrate a comprehensive, all-hazards plan for its main campus and off-site locations to include:

Annual Crime/Security Report Crime Statistics


Crime statistics include reports of, arrests for, and disciplinary actions arising from selected crimes. This page is part of Clark College annual report, which we encourage you to read in full. The annual crime statistics are compiled from data provided by: VPD and campus security authorities. Clark College has no off campus and resident facilities; therefore, no statistics are recorded for these locations. If you have questions regarding the statistics published in this report, please contact Campus Security.

The Annual Crime /Security Report contains statistics concerning the occurrence of crimes on campus, in or on non-campus buildings/ property, and on public property during the most recent calendar year and during the two preceding calendar years for which data is available-of the following criminal offenses reported to campus security authorities or local police agencies. The report is published on the institution’s website at http://www.clark.edu/campus-life/student-support/security/report.php and is made available to faculty, staff and students.  The report includes statistics related to:

Criminal Offenses:

Arrests and Disciplinary Referrals

Hate Crimes
Any of the above-mentioned offenses, and any incidents of Larceny-Theft, Simple Assault, Intimidation, Destruction/Damage/Vandalism of Property and other crimes involving bodily injury to any person, in which the victim is intentionally selected because of the actual or perceived race, gender, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, ethnicity, or disability of the victim that are reported to campus security authorities or local police agencies;

Clark College lists the domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking incidents that were reported to campus security authorities or local police agencies.

The Hierarchy Rule
In cases that involve multiple offenses, Clark College uses the FBI's Uniform Crime Report
Hierarchy Rule. This rule requires the college to count only the most serious offense
when more than one offense was committed during a single incident. A single incident means
that the offenses were committed at the same time and place. That is, the time interval between the offenses and the distance between the locations where they occurred were insignificant.
Beginning with the most serious offense, the following list shows the hierarchy for Clery Act
reporting:

Murder and Non-negligent Manslaughter
Negligent Manslaughter
Sexual Assault
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Burglary
Motor Vehicle Theft

Reported Incidents On or Near College Main Campus Facilities (1)

 

2016

 

2015

 

2014

  

ONC

OCC

NON

 

ONC

OCC

NON

 

ONC

OCC

NON

 Criminal Offenses   (Count by Occurrence) (2)

Murder

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Manslaughter

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Arson

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Sex Offense, Forcible

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

1

0

Sex Offense, Non-forcible

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

Aggravated Assault

2

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

Motor Vehicle Theft

6

0

3

11

0

0

10

0

0

Robbery

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

Burglary

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 Arrests for Violations
(Count by Individual)

Liquor Laws

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Drug Laws

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

1

0

Illegal Weapons

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

 Disciplinary Referrals for Violations

Liquor Laws

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

1

0

0

Drug Laws

0

0

0

1

0

0

11

0

0

Illegal Weapons

 0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

 Relationship Violence and Stalking

Domestic Violence

0

0

0

 

1

0

0

 

1

0

0

Dating Violence

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Stalking

0

0

0

0

0

0

5

0

0

 Hate Related Crimes
(Count by Occurrence and Category)

Race

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

1

0

0

Ethnicity

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Gender

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Disability

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Religion

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

Sexual Orientation

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

  1. Includes incidents reported to College authorities and to the local law enforcement (VPD).
  2. A change to federal law requires that the incident count for certain crimes be reported by geographic category beginning in 1999. Counts for other classifications not required by federal law include only incidents on college facilities unless otherwise designated.
  3. ONC: On-Campus.) This category includes incidents that occurred on the main campus of the College.
  4. OCC: Off-Campus Contiguous. This category includes incidents that occurred on property immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus. This includes incidents that have occurred in Water Works Park (City of Vancouver Parks Department) and reported to the VPD.
  5. NON: Non-Campus Facilities. This category includes incidents that occurred on property other than the main campus, was owned or controlled by the College

 

Reported Incidents On or Near Columbia Tech Center (CTC) (1)

 

2016

 

2015

 

2014

  

ONC

OCC

NON

 

ONC

OCC

NON

 

ONC

OCC

NON

 Criminal Offenses
(Count by Occurrence)
(2)

Murder

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Manslaughter

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Arson

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Sex Offense, Forcible

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Sex Offense, Non-forcible

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Aggravated Assault

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Motor Vehicle Theft

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Robbery

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Burglary

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 Arrests for Violations
(Count by Individual)

Liquor Laws

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Drug Laws

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Illegal Weapons

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 Disciplinary Referrals for Violations

Liquor Laws

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Drug Laws

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Illegal Weapons

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 Relationship Violence and Stalking

Domestic Violence

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Dating Violence

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Stalking

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 Hate Related Crimes
(Count by Occurrence and Category)

Race

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Ethnicity

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Gender

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Disability

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Religion

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Sexual Orientation

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Notes to crime statistics:

  1. NON: Non-Campus Facilities. This category includes incidents that occurred on property other than CTC, was owned or controlled by the College
  2. Includes incidents reported to College authorities and to the local law enforcement (VPD).
  3. A change to federal law requires that the incident count for certain crimes be reported by geographic category beginning in 1999. Counts for other classifications not required by federal law include only incidents on college facilities unless otherwise designated.
  4. ONC: On-Campus.) This category includes incidents that occurred on the CTC campus..
  5. OCC: Off-Campus Contiguous. This category includes incidents that occurred on property immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus.


WSU-V Department of Public Safety is contracted to provide Facilities and Security Coverage at Clark College at WSU-Vancouver (CCW). The below crimes statistics have been taken from the Washington State University-Vancouver Annual Crime Report. Any Clark College student discipline referrals (drugs, alcohol, weapons) would be listed in the Clark College Main Campus statistics in the Non Campus section.

Reported Incidents On or Near College Facilities (1)

 

2016

 

2015

 

2014

  

ONC
(1)

OCC
(2)

NON
(3)

 

ONC
(1)

OCC
(2)

NON
(3)

 

ONC
(1)

OCC
(2)

NON
(3)

 Part I–Reported

Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Negligent Manslaughter

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Sex Offense (Forcible)a

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Sex Offense (Non-forcible)a

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Robbery

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Burglary

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

0

0

Arson

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Aggravated Assault

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Motor Vehicle Theft

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

 Relationship Violence and Stalking

Domestic Violence

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Dating Violence

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Stalking

1

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

 Hate Crimes by Category
[Hate Crimes are defined and listed under the Timely Warnings section of this report]

Race

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Religion

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Gender

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

National Origin

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Disability

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Sexual Orientation

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 PART ONE CRIME TOTALS

1

0

0

2

0

0

2

0

0

 Part II–Reported

Liquor Law Violation

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Drug Abuse Law Violation

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Illegal Weapons Violation

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 PART TWO CRIME TOTALS

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 NUMBER OF ARRESTS AND CAMPUS DISCIPLINE REFERRALS

 ARRESTS

18 Yrs. and Over

1

0

0

 

2

0

0

 

0

0

0

17 Yrs. and Under

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

0

 ARRESTS OR REFERRALS FOR CAMPUS DISCIPLINARY ACTION FOR:

 Alcohol Abuse Violations

Arrests

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Referrals

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 Drug Abuse Violations

Arrests

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Referrals

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 Weapons Possessions/Violations

Arrests

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

Referrals

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 
TABLE NOTES

  1. ONC: On Campus: This category includes incidents that occurred on the main campus.
  2. OCC: Off-campus contiguous. This category includes incidents that occurred on public property immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus. The information in this category is provided by the Clark County Sheriff's Department. For additional information on crime statistics in Clark County, please contact the Clark County Sheriff's Department at: (360) 397-2211.
  3. NON: Non-campus facilities. This category includes incidents that occurred on property other than the main campus owned or controlled by the university and used in support of our educational purposes. WSU has no Non-campus facilities at this time.
  4. The F.B.I. defines forcible sex offenses as: rape and attempted rape, forcible sodomy, sexual assault with an object, and forcible fondling.
  5. The F.B.I. defines non-forcible sex offenses as: incest and statutory rape.
  6. The number of persons referred for disciplinary action does not include persons arrested and reported in the arrest categories above.

Effective from the 1999 calendar year, the Clery Act requires the reporting of crime statistics for an expanded area beyond WSU Vancouver's campus. The law and accompanying regulations also require these statistics to be shown in specific geographic categories (or venues) as defined below.

Federal regulations define On Campus as any building or property owned or controlled by an institution within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area and used by the institution in direct support of, or in a manner related to, the institution's educational purposes, including residence halls; and any building or property that is within or reasonably contiguous to the said area and is owned by the institution but controlled by another person, is frequently used by students, and supports institutional purposes (such as a food or other retail vendor) 34 CFR 668.46(a).

On campus–residential facilities only is a sub-category of On Campus showing the number of on-campus crimes that took place in dormitories or other residential facilities for students on campus 34 CFR 668.46(c)(4)(ii). NOTE: WSU Vancouver does not have residential facilities or a residential population. On adjacent public property is defined as all public property, including thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking facilities, that are within the campus, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus 34 CFR 668.46(a). In or on a non-campus building or property is defined as any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization that is officially recognized by the institution and any building or property owned or controlled by an institution that is used in direct support of, or in relation to, the institution's educational purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution 34 CFR 668.46(a). NOTE: WSU Vancouver has no property meeting this definition.

Hate Crimes: The Clery Act requires the separate reporting, by category of prejudice, of any crime reported in the classifications above and any other crime involving bodily injury that manifests evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the victim's actual or perceived race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, or disability. No hate crimes were reported in the crime classifications in the above table at Washington State University Vancouver from 1998 to 2004.

The University does not record statistics for crimes involving students or student organizations that occur in other law enforcement jurisdictions as part of the Uniform Crime Report. However, the Washington State University Vancouver Department of Public Safety does maintain good communication with local law enforcement and tries to monitor incidents involving students that do occur in other jurisdictions.