EarthWeek2007
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Clark College News and Events


April 6, 2007
For Immediate Release
For additional information:
Barbara Kerr, Executive Director of Communications and Marketing
Telephone: 360-992-2921
bkerr@clark.edu

GLOBAL WARMING: 
BEYOND THE INCONVENIENT TRUTH

On April 21, Clark College will welcome guest speaker
Mary Christina Wood to celebrate Earth Week

VANCOUVER, Wash. –  In celebration of Earth Week, the Clark College Office of Student Life and Multicultural Students Affairs, Clark Conservation Voters and the Friends of Clark County will host guest speaker Mary Christina Wood, Philip H. Knight Professor of Law at the University of Oregon School of Law.  Wood will speak on “Nature’s Trust: A Legal, Political and Moral Frame for Global Warming.”  Wood says she will focus on “global warming beyond the inconvenient truth.” 

The event, which is free and open to the public, will be held on Saturday, April 21 at 3:30 p.m. in the Penguin Student Lounge, located in the college’s Penguin Student Union, 1933 Fort Vancouver Way.

Refreshments will be served.  Music will be provided by the group “Spur of the Moment.”

Clark College alumnus Denis Hayes coordinated the first Earth Day celebration.  Each year, the college hosts special events to draw attention to important environmental issues.

About Mary Christina Wood

Mary Christina Wood, Philip H. Knight Professor of Law at the University of Oregon School of Law. Mary Christina Wood is the Philip H. Knight Professor of Law and Morse Center for Law and Politics Resident Scholar (2006-07) at the University of Oregon School of Law, where she teaches natural resources law, federal Indian law, public lands law, wildlife law, hazardous waste law and property law. 

Wood is the Founding Director of the school’s Environmental and Natural Resources Law Program.  After graduating from Stanford Law School in 1987, she served as a judicial clerk on the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.  She then practiced in the environmental/natural resources department of Perkins Coie, a Pacific Northwest law firm.  Immediately prior to joining the faculty at the University of Oregon in 1992, professor Wood served as special counsel to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in the Endangered Species Act (“God Squad”) exemption proceedings involving the Northern Spotted Owl. 

In 1994, Wood received the University of Oregon’s Ersted Award for Distinguished Teaching and in 2002 she received the Orlando Hollis Faculty Teaching Award.  Professor Wood has published extensively on the Indian trust doctrine, treaty rights, and environmental issues facing native nations and is a frequent speaker on issues relating to natural resources law and the protection of native resources. 

Mary Christina Wood is a co-author of a textbook in natural resources law (West, 2006) in which she presents a full framework of federal, tribal, state and individual ownership.  Professor Wood is currently working on an article applying public trust theory to global warming, seeking to hold the federal government accountable as a sovereign co-tenant trustee of the global atmosphere.  She is also working on a book entitled, Nature’s Trust:  A Legal Paradigm for Protecting Land and Natural Resources for Future Generations.

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