Powwow
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CLARK COLLEGE HOSTS A
POW-WOW
TO CELEBRATE NATIVE AMERICAN CULTURE

Native American dance

Each year, Native Americans across the country celebrate their connections to tradition and spirituality in a social, personal and spiritual meeting:  the pow-wow.   

Adult in tribal gear holding child
On November 18, Clark College welcomed the community for a local pow-wow – a regional celebration of Native American culture. The event was sponsored by Clark College’s College Is Possible program, in conjunction with the Title VII Native American Indian Education Program from the Evergreen School District. It offered a variety of educational activities and a pow-wow at the college’s main campus.    
   
Native American women and young woman in native attireVisitors to the Gaiser Student Center and Penguin Student Union heard from Native American story tellers, learned about Native American current events, and witnessed activities for children to introduce them to Native American culture.

The dancers and drummers from the pow-wow took part in an “Eat and Greet” to talk about their regalia, culture and traditions.  The parents group of the Title VII program provided Indian tacos and fry bread for the “Eat and Greet” event.

Grand Entry at the Pow-wow
The pow-wow began with a Grand Entry in the O’Connell gymnasium.

Interim President Bob Knight, Associated Students of Clark College (ASCC) President Amanda Mayoral and Vancouver Mayor Royce Pollard marched in the Grand Entry as representatives of the college and the community.    

   
Mayor Pollard read a proclamation celebrating Native American Heritage Month and presented it to the Title VII Leaders.  Interim President Bob Knight read from President George W. Bush celebrating Native American Heritage Month and presented it to ASCC President Amanda Mayoral.

ASCC President Amanda Mayoral, Clark College interim President Bob Knight, Clark College Central Services Supervisor Lori Jimerson and Vancouver Mayor Royce Pollard.
Left to right:  ASCC President Amanda Mayoral, Clark College interim President Bob Knight, Clark College Central Services Supervisor Lori Jimerson and Vancouver Mayor Royce Pollard.

The pow-wow also featured a cross-cultural drum exchange between students in the Title VII program and the Vancouver School District’s “One of a Kind” drum line. 

Native American dancer
Associate Director of Student Recruitment Dan Overbay noted, "The pow-wow was an overwhelming success!  Not only was the pow-wow well attended, but we were also able to integrate an educational component into the day that allowed local residents the opportunity to learn more about Native American Culture and Heritage.” 

    
Native American dancer Overbay added, “The pow-wow committee would like to especially thank Dr. Gerard Smith and Professor Dick Shamrell for their contributions for the day’s events.  In addition, the committee would also like to thank machining instructor Dale Waliezer for his excellent work on the medallion presented to Title VII Indian Education Elder Grandma Betty Nasewytewa.”   

Native American dancer

The word pow-wow (which is sometimes written as powwow) comes from the Narragansett word powwaw, meaning "spiritual leader."  Typically, a pow-wow consists of people (Native American and non-Native American alike) meeting to dance, sing, socialize and learn.
   
      
          
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