Chemistry
Chemistry is the study of the properties of materials and the changes that materials undergo. One of the joys of learning chemistry is seeing how chemical principles operate in all aspects of daily life, from everyday activities like lighting a match to more far-reaching matters like the development of drugs to cure cancer or reduce environmental hazards.

People who have degrees in chemistry hold a variety of positions in industry, government, and academia. Those who work in the chemical industry find positions as laboratory chemists, carrying out experiments to develop new products (research and development), analyzing materials (quality control), or assisting customers in using products (sales and services). Analytical and control chemists usually have at least a bachelor's degree. Those with more experience or training may work as managers or company directors. They may also embark in the medical fields or the environmental sciences.

Clark College's Chemistry Department offers a multifaceted curriculum designed to meet a variety of needs -- from those of students pursuing a health-related Applied Science Degree to requirements for earning an Associate in Science in Chemistry, Biology, Engineering, or Physics.
Chemistry (AST1)
This is a suggested program for the first two years of major study in chemistry. Lower-division course requirements will vary depending on the transfer institution. Contact an advisor at the transfer institution to determine required coursework as early as possible. Courses in computer applications are recommended for all students. Additional courses are needed to satisfy graduation requirements for the Associate in Science.
General Education Requirements
Communication Skills (5 credits required)
 
ENGL&101
ENGLISH COMPOSITION I
5 cr.
Quantitative Skills (10 credits required)
 
MATH&151
CALCULUS I
5 cr.
MATH&152
CALCULUS II
5 cr.
Health & Physical Education (3 credits required)
 
Humanities & Social Sciences (15 credits required)
 
CMST&210
INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION
5 cr.
or CMST&220
PUBLIC SPEAKING
5 cr.
or CMST&230
SMALL GROUP COMMUNICATION
5 cr.
GERM&121
GERMAN I
5 cr.
Pre-Major Program Requirements
CHEM&141
GENERAL CHEMISTRY I
4 cr.
CHEM&142
GENERAL CHEMISTRY II
4 cr.
CHEM&143
GENERAL CHEMISTRY III
4 cr.
CHEM&151
GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I
1 cr.
CHEM&152
GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II
1 cr.
CHEM&153
GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY III
2 cr.
PHYS&241
ENGINEERING PHYSICS I
4 cr.
and PHYS&231
ENGINEERING PHYSICS LAB I
1 cr.
PHYS&242
ENGINEERING PHYSICS II
4 cr.
and PHYS&232
ENGINEERING PHYSICS LAB II
1 cr.
PHYS&243
ENGINEERING PHYSICS III
4 cr.
and PHYS&233
ENGINEERING PHYSICS LAB III
1 cr.
Science Electives
CHEM&241
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I
4 cr.
CHEM&242
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II
4 cr.
CHEM&243
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY III
4 cr.
CHEM&251
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I
1 cr.
CHEM&252
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II
1 cr.
CHEM&253
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY III
2 cr.
Other Electives- 0-11 credits
ENGL&102
ENGLISH COMPOSITION II
5 cr.
or ENGL 109
WRITING ABOUT THE SCIENCES
5 cr.
or ENGL&235
TECHNICAL WRITING
5 cr.
MATH 111
COLLEGE ALGEBRA
5 cr.
MATH 221
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
5 cr.
MATH&254
CALCULUS IV
5 cr.
GERM&122
GERMAN II **
5 cr.
GERM&123
GERMAN III **
5 cr.
or another language
 
Total Required Credits: 105
*CMST&230 would count as a social science; otherwise, the third course needs to be a social science.

** Please check with the transfer institution regarding foreign language requirements.
Program Outcomes
Program outcomes are overarching skills that are emphasized and reinforced throughout several courses in a specific program; they are measurable statements that define what students should know or be able to do by the end of a certificate or degree at Clark College. After successful completion of this program, students will be able to:
  • Demonstrate understanding of the derivative as instantaneous rate of change and the definite integral as a limit of a Riemann sum in applied problems.
  • Analyze and solve multi-step problems using techniques through single-variable calculus, and communicate the results.
  • Apply fundamental principles and relationships from the Natural Sciences to solve problems.
  • Apply scientific methodologies to develop and answer questions about the natural world.
  • Acquire scientific information from appropriate sources to analyze issues, claims or situations.
  • Communicate with various audiences using a variety of methods.
  • Demonstrate progress toward healthier behaviors.
  • Analyze, interpret, and evaluate works and ideas in the Humanities within appropriate global and historical contexts.
  • Obtain, evaluate, and ethically use information.
  • Analyze patterns of power, privilege and inequality.
  • Evaluate, analyze, and explain events, behaviors, and institutions using perspectives and methods in the Social Sciences.