Education
Teachers play a direct role in the life of almost every person and in the development of society as a whole. Shortages of trained educators are anticipated in the near future as many of those currently working in the profession reach retirement age.

Elementary teachers instruct students in basic concepts in several subjects, including mathematics, language arts, science, and social studies. They also introduce small children to formal learning in kindergarten.

Secondary teachers usually specialize in teaching one subject to high school students such as English, music, history, mathematics, languages, biology, chemistry, or others. Many secondary teachers spend at least some time teaching outside of their subject area. Duties may also include attending staff meetings, supervising extracurricular activities and meeting with parents.

A minimum of a bachelor's degree plus teaching certification is required to teach in grades kindergarten through 12.

Prospective education students should consult with an education advisor to plan a course of study. At Clark College, students usually complete General Education Requirements within the Associate in Arts degree. A specific course of study should be planned based on the requirements of the senior institution where the student will transfer.
Elementary Education - DTA/MRP (AA)
This pathway is applicable to students planning to prepare for an upper-division elementary education major.

As of January 2006, this document represents a new agreement between the following baccalaureate institutions offering Elementary Education bachelor's degrees and the community and technical colleges system. Baccalaureate institutions party to this agreement are: CWU, EWU, WSU, WWU, City University, Gonzaga, Heritage, PLU, SMU, SPU, Walla Walla University, and Whitworth.

Since Clark has had a long-standing degree path with WSUV in Elementary Education, students should follow the specific MRP for WSUV to ensure that they are meeting WSUV's cohort admissions requirements.

Although not required for this degree, students should be advised they must take the WEST-B in order to apply to teacher preparation programs.

Though this degree does not require such, Clark College students should know that the standard Clark AA degree path has these differences from the MRP defined below:
  • Clark requires 3 credits of Health-Physical Education coursework, and
  • As of Fall 2011, Clark requires a course in Oral Communication, and
  • Clark's Social Science distribution requirement stipulates that students take courses from at least three different departments.
Students must also meet the residency requirements as established by Clark. While Clark College has approved offering the degree below, Clark students should keep these requirements in mind should their transfer pathways change.

Students are responsible for researching and preparing for specific major requirements of baccalaureate
institutions as early as possible prior to transferring.

Please visit the Major Related Programs section of this catalog to view a printable PDF of this document.
Generic DTA Requirements
A. Basic Requirements
 
1. Communication Skills
10 cr.
2. Quantitative/Symbolic Reasoning Requirement
5 cr.
Intermediate algebra proficiency is required.
 
B. Distribution Requirements
 
1. Humanities
15-20 cr.
2. Social Sciences
20 cr.
3. Natural Sciences
 
D. Electives
 
1. Elective Courses
 
Credits that fulfill the requirements listed under MRP Requirements/Major Requirements to bring the total degree to 90 credits.
MRP Requirements
A. Basic Requirements

1. English Composition
10 cr.
2. Quantitative/Symbolic Reasoning Requirement
 
9-15 quarter-based credits of math content at the lower-division level must include number theory, geometry, probability and statistics, with a focus on the development of mathematical concepts in elementary education curriculum. These credits will be accepted by the baccalaureate institutions as fulfilling the lower division math requirements in the Direct Transfer Agreement (DTA) and any additional math credits which may go beyond those requirements will be accepted as electives.

Intermediate algebra proficiency is required.

B. Distribution Requirements
1. Humanities
15-20 cr.
Required
3-5 credits public speaking
5 credits US History (might be a Social Science at some community colleges)
Recommended
7-12 credits from the following list: art, music, literature, or drama/theater
Consistent with the requirements in all DTA degrees - no more than 10 credits per discipline area, 5 credits maximum in world languages or ASL. No more than 5 credits of performance/skills classes are allowed.
2. Social Sciences
20 cr.
Representing at least 3 disciplines, including:
Required
5 credits World Civilization or non-Western History
Recommended
15 credits from the following list: Economics, Geography, Political Science, Psychology, or additional History.

Integrated coursework covering several of these topics is encouraged.
3. Natural Sciences
15 cr.
  • 5 credits Biological Sciences

  • 5 credits Geology or Earth Science

  • 5 credits physical science (Chemistry or Physics)
2 of the above with lab.
C. Major Requirements
 
The baccalaureate institutions will accept 5 quarter credits of education-specific professional introduction coursework, if the coursework meets the following Washington endorsement competencies for Elementary Teachers:
- an exploration of the historical, philosophical and social aspects of elementary education
- an evaluation from the field site supervisor observing the student's work with children
- awareness of the certification process in the state of Washington

A minimum of 30 hours of K-8 classroom experience must be included during the degree program.

3-5 credits in gender/culture coursework

Students should be able to demonstrate computer literacy in software programs including word processing, PowerPoint, and spreadsheets, in addition to being proficient on the Internet. These skills may be demonstrated through a portfolio of files gathered during their education coursework.

D. Electives
 
Other college-level courses, of which a maximum of 15 credits may be in college-level courses as defined by the community college, and the remainder shall be fully transferable as defined by the receiving institution. Where appropriate, preparation courses for the major, minor, or professional certification should ideally be included in this coursework.
Clark College Equivalents
A. Basic Requirements
 
1. Communication Skills
ENGL&101
ENGLISH COMPOSITION I
5 cr.
ENGL&102
ENGLISH COMPOSITION II
5 cr.
2. Quantitative/Symbolic Reasoning Requirement
MATH 122
MATH FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS
5 cr.
and MATH 123
MATH FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS
5 cr.
and MATH 124
MATH FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS
5 cr.
B. Distribution Requirements
 
1. Humanities
CMST&220
PUBLIC SPEAKING (Fulfills oral communication requirement)
5 cr.
HIST&146
UNITED STATES HISTORY I
5 cr.
or HIST&147
UNITED STATES HISTORY II
5 cr.
or HIST&148
UNITED STATES HISTORY III
5 cr.
7-12 additional humanities courses
2.Social Sciences
HIST&126
WORLD CIVILIZATIONS I
5 cr.
or HIST&127
WORLD CIVILIZATIONS II
5 cr.
or HIST&128
WORLD CIVILIZATIONS III
5 cr.
15 additional credits from majors under MRP Requirements/Distribution Requirements/
Social Sciences. No more than 10 credits in one discipline.
3. Natural Sciences
 
15 credits in Natural Sciences include:
  • 5 credits Biological sciences

  • 5 credits Geology or Earth Science

  • 5 credits physical sciences(Chemistry or Physics)

Two of the above with lab.
C. Major Requirements
EDUC&201
INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION
3 cr.
EDUC 210
INTRODUCTORY FIELD EXPERIENCE
3 cr.
2. Social Sciences
 
Students should consult with the transfer institution to ensure fulfillment of this requirement.
3. Natural Sciences
 
Students should consult with the transfer institution to ensure fulfillment of this requirement.
D. Electives
 
Notes
B. Distribution Requirements
2. Social Sciences
 
WSU, CWU, & SM require developmental (lifespan) psychology.
3. Natural Sciences
 
Total Required Credits: 90
General Education Outcomes
  • Information Literacy: Obtain, evaluate, and ethically use information.
  • Communications: Communicate with various audiences using a variety of methods.
  • Quantitative: Perform mathematical calculations without the aid of a calculator and solve quantitative problems and interpret the solutions.
  • Health & Physical Education: Demonstrate progress toward healthier behaviors.
  • Humanities: Analyze, interpret, and evaluate works and ideas in the Humanities within appropriate global and historical contexts.
  • Social Science: Evaluate, analyze and explain events, behaviors, and institutions using perspectives and methods in the Social Sciences.
  • Power, Privilege, and Inequality: Analyze patterns of power, privilege and inequality.
  • Natural Science: Apply fundamental principles and relationships from the Natural Sciences to solve problems, and evaluate claims about the natural world using scientific methodology.
Elementary Education - Transfer to WSU Vancouver (AA)
This pathway is applicable to students planning to prepare for an upper-division elementary education major. This degree is defined specifically for transfer to the WSUV cohort program in elementary education and replaces the AA-DTA/MRP for WSUV transfer in Elementary Education.

Students taking this degree should note that a change in transfer institution might change requirements, and advisors at the transfer institution should be consulted.

The coding for this degree is NOT different that of the standard Elementary Education degree.

Although not required for this degree, students should be advised they must take the WEST-B in order to apply to teacher preparation programs.

Students must also meet the residency requirements as established by Clark. While Clark College has approved offering the degree below, Clark students should keep these requirements in mind should their transfer pathways change.
General Education Requirements
Communication Skills (10 credits required)
ENGL&101
ENGLISH COMPOSITION I
5 cr.
ENGL&102
ENGLISH COMPOSITION II
5 cr.
Quantitative Skills (5 credits required)
MATH 122
MATH FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS
5 cr.
and MATH 123
MATH FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS
5 cr.
and MATH 124
MATH FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS
5 cr.
Health & Physical Education (3 credits required)
 
Oral Communications (5 credits required)
 
Humanities (15 credits required)
CMST&220
PUBLIC SPEAKING (Fulfills oral communication requirement)
5 cr.
MUSC 106
MUSIC IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (List B)
3 cr.
Other Humanities*
7 cr.
Social Sciences (26-30 credits required)
ECON 101
INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS
3 cr.
or ECON&201
MICRO ECONOMICS
5 cr.
or ECON&202
MACRO ECONOMICS
5 cr.
GEOG&100
INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHY
5 cr.
HIST&146
UNITED STATES HISTORY I
5 cr.
or HIST&147
UNITED STATES HISTORY II
5 cr.
or HIST&148
UNITED STATES HISTORY III
5 cr.
POLS 111
AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS
5 cr.
or POLS 171
SURVEY OF THE UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION
3 cr.
PSYC&100
GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY
5 cr.
PSYC&200
LIFESPAN PSYCHOLOGY
5 cr.
Natural Sciences (15 credits required)
 
(must include a lab course)
  • 5 credits Biological Science

  • 5 credits Physical Science

  • 5 credits additional Natural Science
Major Area Requirements
EDUC&201
INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION
3 cr.
(Recommended not required)
EDUC 210
INTRODUCTORY FIELD EXPERIENCE
3 cr.
(Recommended not required)
ENGL 105
ENGLISH GRAMMAR
5 cr.
(Strongly Recommended)
* For this degree only, ENGL105 may fulfill a List A Humanities requirement.
Total Required Credits: 90 Minimum
General Education Outcomes
  • Information Literacy: Obtain, evaluate, and ethically use information.
  • Communications: Communicate with various audiences using a variety of methods.
  • Quantitative: Perform mathematical calculations without the aid of a calculator and solve quantitative problems and interpret the solutions.
  • Health & Physical Education: Demonstrate progress toward healthier behaviors.
  • Humanities: Analyze, interpret, and evaluate works and ideas in the Humanities within appropriate global and historical contexts.
  • Social Science: Evaluate, analyze and explain events, behaviors, and institutions using perspectives and methods in the Social Sciences.
  • Power, Privilege, and Inequality: Analyze patterns of power, privilege and inequality.
  • Natural Science: Apply fundamental principles and relationships from the Natural Sciences to solve problems, and evaluate claims about the natural world using scientific methodology.
Elementary Education DTA/MRP - WSUV Pathway (AA)
This pathway is applicable to students planning to prepare for upper division elementary education major. This degree is defined specifically for transfer to the WSUV cohort program in elementary education and replaces the AA-DTA for WSUV transfer in Elementary Education.

The courses listed below are based on admissions requirements for the 2012 Bachelor of Arts in Education/Teacher Preparation Program. Requirements may change as time goes forward, and students should consult with WSUV to keep abreast of these.

This degree is specifically tailored to WSUV. Students completing this program will receive an Elementary Education DTA/MRP. Students should consult with other institutions about their specific entry requirements.

The coding for this degree is NOT different that of the standard Elementary Education degree.

Although not required for this degree, students should be advised they must take the WEST-B in order to apply to teacher preparation programs.

Though this degree does not require such, Clark College students should know that the standard Clark AA degree path has these differences from the MRP defined below:

a. Clark requires 3 credits of Health-Physical Education course work.

Students must also meet the residency requirements as established by Clark. While Clark College has approved offering the degree below, Clark students should keep these requirements in mind should their transfer pathways change.
Generic DTA Requirements
A. Basic Requirements
 
1.Communication Skills
10 cr.
2.Quantitative/Symbolic Reasoning Requirement
5 cr.
Intermediate algebra proficiency is required
B. Distribution Requirements
 
1.Humanities
15-20 cr.
2.Social Sciences
20 cr.
3.Natural Sciences
 
MRP Requirements
A. Basic Requirements
 
1.English Composition
10 cr.
2.Quantitative/Symbolic Reasoning Requirement
 
9-15 quarter-based credits of math content at the lower division level must include number theory, geometry, probability and statistics, with a focus on the development of mathematical concepts in elementary education curriculum. These credits will be accepted by the baccalaureate institutions as fulfilling the lower division math requirements in the Direct Transfer Agreement (DTA) and any additional math credits which may go beyond those requirements will be accepted as electives.

Intermediate algebra proficiency is required
B. Distribution Requirements
 
1.Humanites
 
15-20 credits in Humanities include:
Required
3-5 credits public speaking
5 credits US History (might be a Social Science at some community colleges).

Recommended
7-12 credits from the following list: art, music, literature, or drama/theater.

Consistent with the requirements in all DTA degrees - no more than 10 credits per discipline area, 5 credits maximum in world languages or ASL. No more than 5 credits of performance/skills classes are allowed.
2.Social Sciences
 
20 credits representing at least 3 disciplines, include:

Required
5 credits World Civilization or non-Western History,

Recommended
15 credits from the following list: Economics, Geography, Political Science, Psychology, or additional History.

Integrated coursework covering several of these topics is encouraged.
3.Natural Sciences
 
15 credits in Natural Sciences include:
  • 5 credit Biological sciences

  • 5 credits Geology or Earth Science

  • 5 credits physical sciences (Chemistry or Physics),
    two of the above with lab.
C. Major Requirements
 
The baccalaureate institutions will accept 5 quarter credits of education-specific professional introduction coursework, if the coursework meets the following Washington endorsement competencies for Elementary Teachers:
- an exploration of the historical, philosophical and social aspects of elementary education
- an evaluation from the field site supervisor observing the student's work with children
- awareness of the certification process in the state of Washington

A minimum of 30 hours of K-8 classroom experience must be included during the degree program.
(Students should consult with the transfer institution to ensure fulfillment of this requirement).

3-5 credits in gender/culture coursework
(Students should consult with the transfer institution to ensure fulfillment of this requirement).

Students should be able to demonstrate computer literacy in software programs including word processing, PowerPoint, spreadsheets, in addition to being proficient on the Internet. These skills may be demonstrated through a portfolio of files gathered during their education course work.
(Students should consult with the transfer institution to ensure fulfillment of this requirement).
D. Electives
 
Elective Courses
 
Other college-level courses, of which a maximum of 15 credits may be in college-level courses as defined by the community college, and the remainder shall be fully transferable as defined by the receiving institution. Where appropriate, preparation courses for the major, minor, or professional certification should ideally be included in this course work.
Clark College Equivalents
A. Basic Requirements
 
ENGL&101
ENGLISH COMPOSITION I
5 cr.
ENGL&102
ENGLISH COMPOSITION II
5 cr.
2.Quantitative/Symbolic Reasoning Requirement
 
MATH 122
MATH FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS
5 cr.
and MATH 123
MATH FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS
5 cr.
and MATH 124
MATH FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS
5 cr.
The Math 120-121 sequence was discontinued in 2011-12 it will continue to be accepted for the degree at this time. New students need to take the 15-credit sequence.
B. Distribution Requirements
 
1.Humanities
 
Requirements:
CMST&220
PUBLIC SPEAKING
5 cr.
Fulfills oral communication requirement
MUSC 106
MUSIC IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
3 cr.
HIST&146
UNITED STATES HISTORY I
5 cr.
or HIST&147
UNITED STATES HISTORY II
5 cr.
or HIST&148
UNITED STATES HISTORY III
5 cr.
Recommended:
ENGL 105
ENGLISH GRAMMAR
5 cr.
Will be accepted as a Humanities course for the Elementary Education degree
2.Social Sciences
 
Required for the MRP
HIST&126
WORLD CIVILIZATIONS I
5 cr.
or HIST&127
WORLD CIVILIZATIONS II
5 cr.
or HIST&128
WORLD CIVILIZATIONS III
5 cr.
Required for WSUV admission
PSYC&100
GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY
5 cr.
PSYC&200
LIFESPAN PSYCHOLOGY
5 cr.
POLS 111
AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS
5 cr.
or POLS 171
SURVEY OF THE UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION
3 cr.
GEOG&100
INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHY
5 cr.
and ECON 101
INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS
3 cr.
or ECON&201
MICRO ECONOMICS
5 cr.
or ECON&202
MACRO ECONOMICS
5 cr.
OR
GEOG&207
ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY
5 cr.
or GEOG 220
THE GEOPOLITICS OF THE MIDDLE EAST
5 cr.
or GEOG 221
THE GEOPOLITICS OF AFRICA
5 cr.
or GEOG 222
THE GEOPOLITICS OF CHINA, JAPAN & EAST ASIA
5 cr.
or GEOG 223
THE GEOPOLITICS OF SOUTH AND CENTRAL ASIA
5 cr.
3.Natural Sciences
 
15 credits in Natural Sciences include:
  • 5 credits Biological sciences

  • 5 credits Geology or Earth Science

  • 5 credits physical sciences (Chemistry or Physics),
    two of the above with lab.
C. Major Requirements
 
1.Communication Skills
 
EDUC&201
INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION
3 cr.
EDUC 210
INTRODUCTORY FIELD EXPERIENCE
3 cr.
D. Electives
 
Elective Courses
 
Credits that fulfill the requirements under MRP Electives to bring the total degree to 90 credits

Notes
A. Basic Requirements
 
2.Quantitative/Symbolic Reasoning Requirement
 
The Math 120-121 sequence was discontinued in 2011-12 it will continue to be accepted for the degree at this time. New students need to take the 15-credit sequence.
B. Distribution Requirements
 
2.Social Sciences
 
GEOG&207 is formerly ECON107 or GEOG 107.

GEOG 207, 220, 221, 222, or 223 will be accepted for both the geography and the economics requirements.
Total Required Credits: 90
General Education Outcomes
  • Information Literacy: Obtain, evaluate, and ethically use information.
  • Communications: Communicate with various audiences using a variety of methods.
  • Quantitative: Perform mathematical calculations without the aid of a calculator and solve quantitative problems and interpret the solutions.
  • Health & Physical Education: Demonstrate progress toward healthier behaviors.
  • Humanities: Analyze, interpret, and evaluate works and ideas in the Humanities within appropriate global and historical contexts.
  • Social Science: Evaluate, analyze and explain events, behaviors, and institutions using perspectives and methods in the Social Sciences.
  • Power, Privilege, and Inequality: Analyze patterns of power, privilege and inequality.
  • Natural Science: Apply fundamental principles and relationships from the Natural Sciences to solve problems, and evaluate claims about the natural world using scientific methodology.