Clark1940s

Clark College in the 1940s:  the war years

Vancouver's old Franklin School became the home of Clark College in 1941

In August 1941, Clark Junior College was preparing to open for fall in its new home -- Vancouver's old Franklin School building (seen in the photo above). To mark the occasion, The Clark County Sun newspaper printed a 12-page special section about the college.

A"supercharged" car reflects Clark Junior College spirit. This photo appeared in the 1940 issue of The Galapagon yearbook.
A"supercharged" car reflects Clark Junior College spirit.  This photo appeared in the 1940 issue of The Galapagon yearbook.
    
1942 graduate Doris Groth, who went on to work for and support the college.  In 2007, she received the college's Outstanding Alumni Award.

    


Ten students graduated in June 1942
.  One of the graduates was Doris Groth (seen in the photo on the left). 

Groth went to work at the college and become an ongoing supporter. 

In 2007, Doris Groth Troxel received the college's Outstanding Alumni Award.

The 1942 issue of The Galapagon yearbook noted the nation's war efforts in its dedication: 

We, the students of Clark Junior College, in order to express a small part of the deep sentiment which fills our hearts, take pleasure in dedicating this 1942 issue of the Galapagon to our students, among the few to whom we owe so much, the former students of Clark Junior who are now serving the armed forces of the United States of America.

Ad for classes at Clark Junior College during World War II

By June of 1943, Clark Junior College was running ads for its classes to support the war effort.

That fall, with attendance declining, the college focused on evening classes.  Those classes were held in Vancouver High School.

By December 1943, the focus was on the future and plans for a new campus for the college in the McLoughlin Heights area of Vancouver.

By January 1944, attendance was still declining.  The college made plans for its next semester but warned that it might have to temporarily close its doors unless registration increased.

Historical records are unclear as to exactly when the college closed.  Newspaper stories reflect limited activities during 1944 -- primarily exhibits by art students at the college.

In fall 1945, with the war ended, the college made plans to reopenClasses resumed on January 21, 1946.